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McCain ‘worried’ about Republican chances to beat Obama

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WASHINGTON — Senior Republican Senator John McCain, who has endorsed Mitt Romney to challenge President Barack Obama, on Wednesday admitted he was worried about his party’s chances of retaking the White House.

After Romney claimed six out of 10 contests on “Super Tuesday,” including the key battleground of Ohio, McCain told CBS News that the bruising battle for the Republican nomination was hurting the party in the long run.

“The longer this goes on, the worse our chances are,” McCain said, according to a transcript of the interview for the “Face to Face” program released by CBS.

“Every day between now and November that is devoted to winning the primary is lost on winning the general election. And that, I have to tell you, it makes me very worried about our chances to win in November.”

Since the Republican presidential nominating contests began in January, various candidates have risen as the best conservative alternative to the frontrunner Romney, only to quickly fade away.

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Romney meanwhile has still failed to energize the divided party’s conservative base — something which McCain said he could not understand.

The Arizona senator accused both former House speaker Newt Gingrich and former senator Rick Santorum of “corruption.”

“It’s curious to me that ‘conservatives’ are supporting Santorum or Gingrich, who were earmarkers and pork-barrelers (during their terms in Congress), which is corruption,” McCain said.

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But McCain, who has long publicly battled earmarks, said it was not up to him to call for Gingrich or Santorum to quit the race.

Instead, he urged Romney to “to focus a little bit more… on what he’s going to do on the economy and jobs.”

“You know that every single day of a campaign is a day you can’t do over,” said McCain, noting that a candidate’s unfavorable ratings rise the longer a tough race drags on.

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In 2008, McCain scored the Republican presidential nomination after Romney dropped out of the race, but lost the general election to Obama.


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2012

Here are 7 wild, bizarre and pathetic moments from Trump’s ‘campaign launch’

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On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump held a rally that was billed as the official launch his re-election campaign — though he has never really stopped holding campaign rallies.

As expected, the president ranted, lied, and engaged in the raucous attacks that are central to his connection with Republican voters. Some of it was actually just sad, such as his continued obsession with Hillary Clinton.

Here are seven of the wildest, disturbing and pathetic moments from the rally:

1. He said Democrats "want to destroy our country as we know it."

Trump casually accuses Democrats of "want[ing] to destroy you and they want to destroy our country as we know it." pic.twitter.com/4K79KlbEeR

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2012

British PM candidates clash over Brexit as Boris Johnson skips debate

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Candidates to become Britain's next prime minister clashed over Brexit strategy at their first debate on Sunday but the frontrunner, Boris Johnson, dodged the confrontation.

The 90-minute debate on Channel 4 featured the five remaining candidates and an empty podium for Johnson, the gaffe-prone former foreign secretary and former mayor of London.

In sometimes ill-tempered exchanges, four of the five candidates said they would seek to renegotiate the draft Brexit divorce deal agreed with Brussels even though EU leaders have repeatedly ruled this out.

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2012

Michael Cohen ordered back to Congress on March 6

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President Donald Trump's so-called "fixer" is being asked to return to Congress for more questioning on March 6.

Outside of the closed-door committee hearing Thursday, Cohen said that the House Intelligence Committee is seeking further information, according to Washington Examiner writer Byron York.

Michael Cohen finished closed-door testimony before House Intel Committee, says he's coming back for another session March 6. Again: No reason for secrecy. Transcripts should be released ASAP.

— Byron York (@ByronYork) February 28, 2019

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