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Romney: Young people ‘have to vote for me’

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Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney declared on Monday that “young voters in this country have to vote for me.”

During a press conference in Aston, Pennsylvania, the candidate told reporters that young Americans should reconsider their support for President Barack Obama.

“I think young voters in this country have to vote for me if they’re really thinking about what’s in the best interest of the country and what’s in their personal best interests,” he explained. “Because the president’s policies have led to extraordinary statistics. And when you look at 50 percent of the kids coming out of college today can’t find a job or can’t find a job that is consistent with their skills. How in the world can you be supporting a president that’s led to that kind of economy?”

“I think that young people will understand that ours is the party of opportunity and jobs,” the former Massachusetts governor continued. “If they want to have a president that can create good jobs and can allow them to find them a bright and prosperous future for themselves and for their families then I hope their going to vote for me.”

“I think this is a time when young people are questioning the support they gave to President Obama three and a half years ago. He promised bringing the country together. That sure hasn’t happened. He promised a future with good jobs and good opportunity. That hasn’t happened.”

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After the press conference ended, Romney returned the the microphone and added that he “fully” supported an extension of low interest rates on student loans, a position that puts him in opposition to House Republicans.

“There was some concern that that would expire halfway through the year, and I support extending the temporary relief on interest rates for students as a result of student loans, obviously, in part because of the extraordinarily poor conditions in the job market.”

A recent survey by the Public Religion Research Institute found that 48 percent of voters aged 18 to 24 support a second term for Obama, compared with 41 percent who would like to see a Republican in the White House.

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In 2008, Obama won the age group by 34 points over Sen. John McCain (R-AZ).

Watch this video from CNN, broadcast April 23, 2012.

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2012

Here are 7 wild, bizarre and pathetic moments from Trump’s ‘campaign launch’

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On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump held a rally that was billed as the official launch his re-election campaign — though he has never really stopped holding campaign rallies.

As expected, the president ranted, lied, and engaged in the raucous attacks that are central to his connection with Republican voters. Some of it was actually just sad, such as his continued obsession with Hillary Clinton.

Here are seven of the wildest, disturbing and pathetic moments from the rally:

1. He said Democrats "want to destroy our country as we know it."

Trump casually accuses Democrats of "want[ing] to destroy you and they want to destroy our country as we know it." pic.twitter.com/4K79KlbEeR

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2012

British PM candidates clash over Brexit as Boris Johnson skips debate

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Candidates to become Britain's next prime minister clashed over Brexit strategy at their first debate on Sunday but the frontrunner, Boris Johnson, dodged the confrontation.

The 90-minute debate on Channel 4 featured the five remaining candidates and an empty podium for Johnson, the gaffe-prone former foreign secretary and former mayor of London.

In sometimes ill-tempered exchanges, four of the five candidates said they would seek to renegotiate the draft Brexit divorce deal agreed with Brussels even though EU leaders have repeatedly ruled this out.

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2012

Michael Cohen ordered back to Congress on March 6

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President Donald Trump's so-called "fixer" is being asked to return to Congress for more questioning on March 6.

Outside of the closed-door committee hearing Thursday, Cohen said that the House Intelligence Committee is seeking further information, according to Washington Examiner writer Byron York.

Michael Cohen finished closed-door testimony before House Intel Committee, says he's coming back for another session March 6. Again: No reason for secrecy. Transcripts should be released ASAP.

— Byron York (@ByronYork) February 28, 2019

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