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Occupy Wall Street trial begins for protesters accused of trespassing

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Eight Occupy Wall Street protesters accused of trespassing on the property of a New York church in December went on trial Monday.

The courtroom was packed and an overflow of Occupy supporters spilled out into the hall as a Manhattan judge heard the testimony of New York City police officers who arrested protesters in a vacant lot on December 17.

Legal representatives for Trinity Church, a historic New York City institution that is also a big force in Manhattan real estate, were also in court.

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Attorneys for the defendants questioned the orders received by officers to make arrests, whether they noticed “open to the public” signs posted around the property and whether Trinity Church had the authority to order police to clear the area of demonstrators.

Trinity Church has said it is “not seeking retribution or punishment as a result of the OWS actions of December 17 at Duarte Square”.

In a statement posted to the church’s website Rector James Cooper claimed that Trinity had requested the district attorney seek “non-criminal dispositions without fines or incarceration be granted to all”.

“Trinity has welcomed and continues to welcome OWS members, like all members of its community, to its facilities in the Wall Street area,” he said.

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Trinity provided a variety of services to Occupy protesters in the initial months of the movement, but when the movement was ousted from its original encampment in lower Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park on November 17 the relationship became strained.

The morning after the eviction protesters marched to a nearby lot believed to be owned by Trinity Church. A hole was cut in the fence surrounding the property as number of protesters entered and about 20 were arrested. A month later, on December 17, Occupy protesters again attempted to move into the space, using a ladder to gain access to the lot. Dozens were arrested.

Most of those arrested accepted a variety of plea deals. The remaining eight protesters still facing charges, who opted to take their case to trial, include prominent episcopalian priest George Packard and Jack Boyle, a 57-year-old man who is HIV-positive.

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For the last 23 days Boyle has refused to take his medication, for the last 19 he has not eaten. As he waited to take his seat in the courtroom Monday morning Boyle said he felt “weak”.

Boyle hopes that his actions will draw attention to the case and the Occupy movement. Specifically, he has called upon Trinity Church to drop all charges against his fellow defendants and demanded an apology from New York mayor Michael Bloomberg over his treatment of the protesters over the last 10 months.

Packard had a blueprint in his pocket when he jumped climbed a ladder into the park that day. It laid out plans for the space that included a medical clinic, a food station and more.

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Speaking outside the countroom, Packard said he believes the arrests and the trial have disturbing implications for the faith he serves.

“I’m concerned that the church I love has changed around me,” Packard said. It seems, Packard suggested, “Relevant witness has become a polite conversation piece.”

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News and Media 2012

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Swiss holding ‘funeral march’ to mark disappearance of an Alpine glacier

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Dozens of people will undertake a "funeral march" up a steep Swiss mountainside on Sunday to mark the disappearance of an Alpine glacier amid growing global alarm over climate change.

The Pizol "has lost so much substance that from a scientific perspective it is no longer a glacier," Alessandra Degiacomi, of the Swiss Association for Climate Protection, told AFP.

The organisation which helped organise Sunday's march said around 100 people were due to take part in the event, set to take place as the UN gathers youth activists and world leaders in New York to mull the action needed to curb global warming.

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2020 Election

UAW strike ‘threatens to upend the economy in Michigan’ — and could destroy Trump’s re-election: report

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At the end of the first week of a major strike by the United Auto Workers, the employment standoff threatens to upend President Donald Trump's 2020 re-election map, the Chicago Times reported Saturday.

Approximately 46,000 workers have been striking against General Motors.

There are two major threats to Trump's campaign from the strike.

The first is that the strike could cause regional recessions -- threatening Trump's political standing in key Rust Belt states.

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Security forces fired live rounds at protesters calling for the ouster of Egyptian president: report

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Egyptian security forces clashed with hundreds of anti-government protesters in the port city of Suez on Saturday, firing tear gas and live rounds, said several residents who participated in the demonstrations.

A heavy security presence was also maintained in Cairo's Tahrir Square, the epicentre of Egypt's 2011 revolution, after protests in several cities called for the removal of general-turned-president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

Such demonstrations are rare after Egypt effectively banned protests under a law passed following the 2013 military ouster of Islamist ex-president Mohamed Morsi.

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