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Ann Romney on tax returns: ‘We’ve given all you people need to know’

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Anne Romney, the wife of GOP hopeful Mitt Romney, on Thursday insisted that she and her husband would not be giving voters any more information about their tax returns because they had “given all you people need to know.”

“You know, you should really look at where Mitt has led his life, and where he’s been financially,” Ann Romney told ABC’s Robin Roberts. “He’s a very generous person. We give 10 percent of our income to our church every year. Do you think that is the kind of person who is trying to hide things, or do things? No. He is so good about it. Then, when he was governor of Massachusetts, didn’t take a salary for four years.”

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“We’ve given all you people need to know and understand about our financial situation and how we live our life,” the candidate’s wife added.

Regarding the Obama campaign’s attacks on Mitt Romney’s connection to jobs that were sent overseas by his former company, Bain Capital, Ann Romney said that “it was beneath the dignity of the office of the president to do something as egregious as that.”

The Democratic National Committee on Wednesday apologized for a web video that featured a dancing horse to mock the former Massachusetts governor for not releasing his tax returns. The dressage horse, which is owned by the Romneys, will perform ballet at the Summer Olympic Games in London.

“It makes me laugh, it’s like, ‘Really?’” Ann Romney explained on Thursday. “There’s so many people out of work right now. And there’s this guy right here who has the answers for fixing the economy and all these attacks, they’re gonna try everything.”

“Basically, my philosophy is they’re gonna fire the coach,” she predicted. “I already sort of know the answer. At the end of the day, they’re going to fire the coach because things aren’t going well.”

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Watch this video from ABC’s Good Morning America via Mediaite, broadcast July 19, 2012.

(h/t: Politico)

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