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Most young adults expect marriage for life: study

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WASHINGTON — Eighty-six percent of young adults in the United States expect their marriages to last a lifetime, even though half of all marriages end in divorce, a study released Wednesday suggests.

The Clark University Poll of Emerging Adults also found that 57 percent of Americans aged 18 to 29 feel it is wrong for two people to have sex if they are not emotionally involved with each other.

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And 73 percent of the 1,029 respondents from across the United States who participated in the study believed that couples should walk down the aisle and exchange wedding vows before having a child.

Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, a psychology professor at Clark University, a small liberal arts college in Worcester, Massachusetts, said the results indicated how optimistic young Americans feel about marriage.

“They grow up knowing that half of marriages end in divorce, yet nearly all of them expect to be in the half that doesn’t,” said Arnett, who led the study conducted through mobile phone, telephone and Internet interviews.

“Of today’s emerging adults, the ones with divorced parents are often the ones who are most determined to avoid divorce, even though they are statistically most likely to get divorced themselves.”

The study revealed, however, that 61 percent of young American adults expect to give up some of their career goals in order to have the family life they want — with men as likely as women to have such expectations.

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“Traditionally, women have been far more likely to sacrifice career goals for family,” said Arnett, whose study had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.06 percent.

“These new findings suggest that this may change in the new generation of emerging adults to a more equal sharing of family responsibilities.”

Twenty-three percent of participants in the survey were married, 10 percent living with a partner and 22 percent in a “close relationship.” Twenty-nine percent said they were currently in no relationship at all.

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Marie-Antoinette and lover’s censored letters deciphered

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Love letters between the ill-fated French queen Marie-Antoinette and her lover, which contain key passages rendered illegible by censor marks, have been deciphered using new techniques, the French National Archives said on Wednesday.

The revealed passages are further confirmation of the steamy relationship between Marie-Antoinette and Count de Fersen, who were writing to each other two years after the 1789 French revolution.

At the time, the queen and King Louis XVI were living under surveillance in the Parisian Tuileries palace and had just failed to escape their house arrest.

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Trump’s attempt to look tough backfires — and even Republicans seem to see the writing on the wall

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From the moment that protests against racist police violence started to spread from Minneapolis to the rest of the country (and the world), after a white police officer named Derek Chauvin killed an unarmed black man named George Floyd in a gruesome incident captured on video, it's been clear that Donald Trump thought this was exactly the Hail Mary he needed to win re-election. Trump has been desperate for a way to distract the country from the soaring death rate of the coronavirus pandemic (now at 108,000 and counting) and the 40 million left unemployed in the resulting economic collapse. He believed that a racist and sadistic backlash against the protesters was just the ticket.

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Snapchat curbs Trump for inciting ‘racial violence’ as Facebook looks the other way

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Snapchat on Wednesday became the latest social network moving to curb the reach of inflammatory comments by US President Donald Trump, claiming the president has been inciting "racial violence."

The youth-focused social network said it would no longer promote Trump on its Discover platform for recommended content.

"We will not amplify voices who incite racial violence and injustice by giving them free promotion on Discover," a statement from Snapchat said.

The move came days after Twitter took an unprecedented stand by hiding a Trump post it said promoted violence, heating up the White House war with Silicon Valley and social media.

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