Quantcast
Connect with us

Most young adults expect marriage for life: study

Published

on

WASHINGTON — Eighty-six percent of young adults in the United States expect their marriages to last a lifetime, even though half of all marriages end in divorce, a study released Wednesday suggests.

The Clark University Poll of Emerging Adults also found that 57 percent of Americans aged 18 to 29 feel it is wrong for two people to have sex if they are not emotionally involved with each other.

ADVERTISEMENT

And 73 percent of the 1,029 respondents from across the United States who participated in the study believed that couples should walk down the aisle and exchange wedding vows before having a child.

Jeffrey Jensen Arnett, a psychology professor at Clark University, a small liberal arts college in Worcester, Massachusetts, said the results indicated how optimistic young Americans feel about marriage.

“They grow up knowing that half of marriages end in divorce, yet nearly all of them expect to be in the half that doesn’t,” said Arnett, who led the study conducted through mobile phone, telephone and Internet interviews.

“Of today’s emerging adults, the ones with divorced parents are often the ones who are most determined to avoid divorce, even though they are statistically most likely to get divorced themselves.”

The study revealed, however, that 61 percent of young American adults expect to give up some of their career goals in order to have the family life they want — with men as likely as women to have such expectations.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Traditionally, women have been far more likely to sacrifice career goals for family,” said Arnett, whose study had a margin of error of plus or minus 3.06 percent.

“These new findings suggest that this may change in the new generation of emerging adults to a more equal sharing of family responsibilities.”

Twenty-three percent of participants in the survey were married, 10 percent living with a partner and 22 percent in a “close relationship.” Twenty-nine percent said they were currently in no relationship at all.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump supporter accused of voter fraud invited to apply for a pardon — in gratitude for proving ‘how hard voter fraud is’

Published

on

On Wednesday, writing on Twitter, Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. John Fetterman invited a Trump supporter accused of voter fraud to apply for a pardon if convicted — in thanks for showing Pennsylvania voters, and Republicans around the country, how difficult it is to commit voter fraud.

The case centers on a man in Forty Fort, Luzerne County, who allegedly filled out an absentee ballot application for his deceased mother with the intention of casting a second ballot for President Donald Trump, in her name. He faces up to 10 years in prison if found guilty.

Continue Reading

COVID-19

One-third of Americans will Ignore CDC warnings this Thanksgiving: report

Published

on

A new study shared exclusively with Axios has revealed that approximately one-third of Americans say they're likely to ignore health officials' warnings about the risks of getting together for Thanksgiving.

The coronavirus pandemic is creating an overflow at hospitals around the nation -- a real threat of being turned away for needed care is possible if the course of the virus is not altered within the next few weeks.

"Solid majorities said they're likely to follow CDC guidelines and avoid traveling or gathering with people who don't live in the same home," Axios reported Wednesday. "But the 25-30 percent who don't plan to follow those guidelines represent millions of people. And when millions of people are traveling or gathering indoors, that represents a real risk of new or worsening outbreaks — especially right now, when infections are at an all-time high."

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Georgia GOP secretary of state: Trump ‘threw my family under the bus’ even though we voted for him

Published

on

Brad Raffensperger, the Republican secretary of state in Georgia, has written an angry editorial for USA Today in which he details the harassment he and his family have been subjected to because he followed the law and certified President-elect Joe Biden's victory.

Raffensperger starts out his editorial by praising the Peach State for holding a free and fair election under difficult circumstances stemming from the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Continue Reading