Quantcast
Connect with us

Minnie Mouse and Americana hit London Fashion Week

Published

on

British designer Jasper Conran brought a taste of 1970s Americana to London Fashion Week on Saturday, while some of his colleagues paid tribute to an unlikely style icon — Minnie Mouse.

On the second day of London Fashion Week, barefoot models trampled a grassy catwalk as they showed off Conran’s spring/summer 2013 collection against a psychedelic backdrop of neon flowers.

ADVERTISEMENT

Conran, the son of pioneering homeware designer Terence Conran, presented a string of whimsical mini-dresses in lime-green and orange crochet and white lace.

Touches of patchwork, alongside denim shorts teamed with sleeveless vests for a cow-girl look, gave another nod to twee Americana.

The 52-year-old’s collection veered from the androgynous — in the form of a severe white trouser suit — to the voluptuously feminine, including a strapless dress in brilliant red.

A sequinned mini-dress harked back to the dawn of disco, while a majestic ball-gown added a touch of hippy chic.

At the more playful end of Saturday’s programme, a dozen designers including Giles Deacon and Lulu Guiness created one-off works inspired by Disney’s Minnie Mouse to be auctioned off for charity on eBay.

ADVERTISEMENT

Richard Nicoll turned Minnie’s famous black ears into the shoulders of a strapless dress that featured a print of her with Mickey — her boyfriend since the two mice were created in 1928.

Hand-painted wedge heels by Terry de Havilland paid tribute to the red and white polka-dot print of her dress, as did a long, layered skirt by Dutch designer Michael van der Ham.

He teamed it with a top featuring a sequinned outline of Minnie’s head.

ADVERTISEMENT

“I really like when little girls wear tourist t-shirts with the silhouette of Minnie’s face,” van der Ham explained.

“They’re normally printed so I wanted to refabricate that in a couture, hand-made piece,” he told AFP.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sunday is one of the biggest days in the London Fashion Week programme, with highlights set to include a show from punk queen Vivienne Westwood.

The British fashion industry generates £21 billion ($34 billion, 26 million euros) every year and employs more than 80,000 people, according LFW’s organisers, the British Fashion Council.

Some 5,000 buyers, journalists and photographers are expected to attend the shows, which organisers hope will bring in orders worth £100 million ($160 million).

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘It’s only $4.99 per month’: Trump urges supporters to sign up for network that went to Ukraine with Giuliani

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Friday night urged his 67 million Twitter followers to pay for a monthly subscription to watch Facebook video from a far-right Fox News competitor.

Shortly after 10 p.m. eastern, the commander-in-chief retweeted a solicitation from the One America News network.

[caption id="attachment_1569174" align="aligncenter" width="800"] Screengrab of President Donald Trump's retweet of a One America News solicitation.[/caption]

Continue Reading

Facebook

NPR is still expanding the range of what authority sounds like after 50 years

Published

on

From its start half a century ago, National Public Radio heralded a new approach to the sound of radio in the United States.

NPR “would speak with many voices and many dialects,” according to “Purposes,” its founding document.

Written in 1970, this blueprint rang with emotional immediacy. NPR would go on the air for the first time a year later, on April 20, 1971.

NPR is sometimes mocked, perhaps most memorably in a 1998 “Saturday Night Live” sketch starring actor Alec Baldwin, for its staid sound production and its hosts’ carefully modulated vocal quality. But the nonprofit network’s commitment to including “many voices” hatched a small sonic revolution on the airwaves.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Ex-Infowars staffer exposes the twisted world of Alex Jones in a new tell-all article

Published

on

Some people listen to far-right conspiracy theorist/radio host and Infowars founder Alex Jones purely for the entertainment value; many of Jones’ hardcore followers, however, take him quite seriously. Former employee Josh Owens used to be one of them. But in a tell-all article for the New York Times, the Texas-based writer explains why he changed his mind and quit what he once considered a dream job.

Owens recalls that he first went to work for Jones in 2012. The writer explains, “Jones — wanting to expand his website, Infowars, into a full-blown guerrilla news operation and hoping to scout new hires from his growing fan base — held an online contest. At 23, I was vulnerable, angry and searching for direction. So, I decided to give it a shot. Out of what Infowars said were hundreds of submissions, my video — a half-witted, conspiratorial glance at the creation and function of the Federal Reserve — made it to the final round.”

Continue Reading