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Montana gubernatorial candidate compares getting an abortion to taking aspirin

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The Republican candidate in the Montana governor’s race likened the decision to get an abortion to taking an aspirin during the state’s first gubernatorial debate earlier this week.

“You can’t give a child an aspirin in school, but you can refer people to have an abortion without parental consent, and that’s wrong,” former state Rep. Rick Hill (R) said Wednesday night while expressing support for a referendum on the state ballot this November that would require women under 18 to get parental consent before having an abortion.

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Hill’s opponent, Democratic state attorney general Steve Bullock, has opposed the referendum.

“Complicated, difficult and incredibly personal decisions like this should not be made by the government,” Bullock told The Billings Gazette earlier this year. “They should be made by a woman, in consultation with her family, her doctor and her faith. Montanans recognize and cherish an individual right of privacy — a change recognized under the U.S. Constitution and explicitly enshrined in Montana’s Constitution.”

Bullock and Hill are running to succeed Governor Brian Schweitzer (D), whose term expires this year. A third candidate, Libertarian Ron Vandevender, was not invited to take part in the debate at Helena Middle School.

Hill said he reached his stance after getting advice from moral leaders.

“This is one of the bills that the governor vetoed, and I think it was a mistake for him to veto that bill,” Hill said. “I think this is a good piece of legislation, I intend to vote for it, and I support it.”

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Hill’s remarks, posted on YouTube Wednesday by “Montana Democrat,” can be seen below.

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Matt Gaetz forgot which network he was on: Surprised CNN anchor said ‘I’ve never been called Sean Hannity’

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Rep. Matt Gaetz seemed to confuse cable news networks during a Thursday appearance

Gaetz was interviewed by CNN's Chris Cuomo, who aggressively challenged Gaetz on the facts as the Florida Republican attempted to defend President Donald Trump.

Despite the fact Cuomo's interview was nothing like the puff segments Gaetz is used to on Fox, the congressman seemed confused by the end.

"Congressman, you are always welcome, wherever I am, at nine or eleven, whenever," Cuomo said.

"Thanks Sean," Gaetz replied.

"Did you just call me Sean?" Cuomo asked. "Did you just call me Sean?"

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Internet debates ‘the dumbest thing Brian Kilmeade has ever said’

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Fox News personality Brian Kilmeade has received a great deal of attention -- and criticism -- during the Trump era.

Kilmeade co-hosts one of the President's favorite shows, "Fox and Friends," with Steve Doocy and Ainsley Earhardt on weekday mornings. He also a show on the Fox News Radio network and frequently appears on "The Five."

The former Ultimate Fighting Championship play-by-play sportscaster has also been harshly criticized for the type of comments that make the show a favorite for the president.

Journalist Molly Jong-Fast, who was widely praised her interview of Lisa Page, decided to explore Kilmeade's comments.

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Giuliani’s potential witness tampering in Ukraine is impossible to separate from Trump: Judiciary Democrat

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On Thursday's edition of MSNBC's "The Beat," Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-CA) broke down how Rudy Giuliani's misconduct in Ukraine is "inseparable" from President Donald Trump's.

"To everyone who asks whether we are moving too quickly, I say the president's lawyer is moving quickly to continue to ask a foreign government to cheat our elections, and doing nothing is completely off the table," said Swalwell, who sits on the House Intelligence and Judiciary Committees, the two most crucial committees in the impeachment inquiry. "We have to secure our elections. We have powerful, uncontradicted evidence now. And now is the time to hold the president accountable and determine just which impeachment articles we should proceed with."

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