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Security rules for Democratic National Convention cause concern

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A new ordinance for “extraordinary events” put in place by the city of Charlotte, North Carolina, which is hosting the Democratic National Convention this week, have left attendees as well as protesters uncertain of what seemingly innocent possessions might be considered a cause for arrest.

Handguns and rifles, of course, are perfectly legal to carry openly under state law, although carrying a concealed weapon requires a permit. But people could face arrest for carrying water bottles, hair spray, socks, or magic markers.

The rules explicitly ban “handbags, backpacks, soda cans, drink coolers, scarves, bike helmets, baby strollers, and non-service animals” within the hundred-square-block event zone. But what about a “container or object of sufficient weight to be used as a projectile.” The Associated Press suggests that this could “include almost anything from an apple to an iPhone.”

Two people were arrested during a demonstration on Sunday, but not as a result of the new ordinance. One protester was wearing a mask and was allegedly found to be carrying a knife and one bystander was accused of disorderly conduct.

Charlotte City Attorney Robert Hagemann, who helped draft the ordinance, justifies it on the grounds that “while the vast majority [of protesters] are law-abiding and peaceful, expressing their First Amendment rights, a number of folks use the opportunity of large crowds and a platform to cause harm and violence.”

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That does not satisfy observers like Chris Brook of the American Civil Liberties Union of North Carolina, who is particularly worried about the ban on bags that are “carried with the intent to conceal weapons or other prohibited items.” That provision seems to allow the police to perform warrantless searches and arrest anyone who refuses.

“I think it could easily lead to situations where there is some profiling going on,” Brook suggested. “For example a person wearing a business suit might be far less likely to be searched than some other individuals.”

Hagemann insists that police offers will rely on their training, experience, and common sense. However, protest leaders have already expressed concern that the more than 5000 officers on the scene will abuse their powers, especially since they have been getting only twenty minutes of training in the new rules.

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Relatively few protesters showed up at the Republican convention in Tampa last week. More are expected in Charlotte — from the right as well as the left — but if Sunday’s low turnout is any indication, that may not happen.

“I think this is an attempt to vilify protesters,” Michael Zytkow of Occupy Charlotte told the Associated Press. “I think it’s an attempt to prevent us from coming out and joining and expressing our rights to march on the street and express our grievances.”

Zytkow, who was arrested when he spoke for more than his allotted three minutes at the meeting where the ordinance was adopted, later tried to test the rules by rolling a cooler full of water bottles down the street at the time of a corporate shareholders meeting to which the ordinance applied. Police ignored him.

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Photo of Charlotte police on September 1 by Ken Fager via Flickr


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2012

Here are 7 wild, bizarre and pathetic moments from Trump’s ‘campaign launch’

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On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump held a rally that was billed as the official launch his re-election campaign — though he has never really stopped holding campaign rallies.

As expected, the president ranted, lied, and engaged in the raucous attacks that are central to his connection with Republican voters. Some of it was actually just sad, such as his continued obsession with Hillary Clinton.

Here are seven of the wildest, disturbing and pathetic moments from the rally:

1. He said Democrats "want to destroy our country as we know it."

Trump casually accuses Democrats of "want[ing] to destroy you and they want to destroy our country as we know it." pic.twitter.com/4K79KlbEeR

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2012

British PM candidates clash over Brexit as Boris Johnson skips debate

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Candidates to become Britain's next prime minister clashed over Brexit strategy at their first debate on Sunday but the frontrunner, Boris Johnson, dodged the confrontation.

The 90-minute debate on Channel 4 featured the five remaining candidates and an empty podium for Johnson, the gaffe-prone former foreign secretary and former mayor of London.

In sometimes ill-tempered exchanges, four of the five candidates said they would seek to renegotiate the draft Brexit divorce deal agreed with Brussels even though EU leaders have repeatedly ruled this out.

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2012

Michael Cohen ordered back to Congress on March 6

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President Donald Trump's so-called "fixer" is being asked to return to Congress for more questioning on March 6.

Outside of the closed-door committee hearing Thursday, Cohen said that the House Intelligence Committee is seeking further information, according to Washington Examiner writer Byron York.

Michael Cohen finished closed-door testimony before House Intel Committee, says he's coming back for another session March 6. Again: No reason for secrecy. Transcripts should be released ASAP.

— Byron York (@ByronYork) February 28, 2019

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