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Mike Tyson barred from entering New Zealand

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WELLINGTON — The New Zealand government on Wednesday blocked former heavyweight boxing champion and convicted rapist Mike Tyson from entering the country.

Tyson had originally been granted a visa, despite opposition from Prime Minister John Key, to visit in November for a charity event.

But associate Immigration Minister Kate Wilkinson said the visa has now been cancelled after the show sponsor, the Life Education Trust, made clear it “no longer wants to have any involvement” with Tyson’s visit.

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“Given that the Trust is no longer supporting the event, on balance, I have made the decision to cancel his visa to enter New Zealand for the Day of the Champions event,” the minister said.

Wilkinson said the original decision to grant Tyson a visa was “a finely balanced call” and the letter of support from the Trust was a significant factor in approving the application.

Tyson was sentenced to six years in prison in 1992 for raping an 18-year-old woman and under New Zealand law anyone sentenced to more than five years in jail is denied a visa, although this can be waived in certain circumstances.

Key had described the Tyson visa decision as “a line ball call”.

He said he did not understand the rationale behind allowing Tyson into the country and said he would never approve a visa being granted to someone with a serious conviction such as violence against a woman.

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“I can see it from both sides, maybe it was a long time ago, but in my view they are very, very serious issues,” he said.

Life Education Trust chief executive John O’Connell told Fairfax Media his board had initially turned Tyson down and the letter of support was written by a well-meaning volunteer.

“We are a charity that works with children and their self-esteem and relationships with others. Clearly there is a brand values disconnect, we believed, between being involved with Mr Tyson,” O’Connell said.

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“Certainly the rape conviction was the key thing.”

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Teenage boy’s family objects to ProPublica publication of video detailing his death

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The family of a teenage boy whose death ProPublica investigated has objected to the publication of a surveillance video that documented his last hours.

Yesterday, ProPublica published a detailed account of failings and missteps by the U.S. Border Patrol, in whose custody 16-year-old Carlos Gregorio Hernandez Vasquez died. As part of the story, ProPublica published several moments from a lengthy surveillance video in which Carlos struggles on the floor of his cell and then stops moving. The video, which had not been shared with Congress or the public, contradicts the government’s claim that Carlos was discovered as a result of a “welfare check.’’ It shows that his cellmate awoke, saw his motionless body, and summoned Border Patrol agents.

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Mass rally marks six-month anniversary of Hong Kong protest movement

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Hong Kong democracy protesters are hoping for huge crowds later Sunday at a rally they have billed as a "last chance" for the city's pro-Beijing leaders in a major test for the six-month-old movement.

The march comes two weeks after pro-establishment parties got a drubbing in local elections, shattering government claims that a "silent majority" opposed the protests.

But activists say public anger is building once more after chief executive Carrie Lam and Beijing ruled out any further concessions despite the landslide election defeat.

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Pensacola gunman showed mass shooting videos at party: report

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The Saudi military student who carried out a deadly shooting spree at a US naval base showed videos of mass shootings at a dinner party the night before the attack, The New York Times reported Saturday.

The shooting Friday in a classroom building at Naval Air Station Pensacola in Florida left three dead and eight wounded, including two responding sheriff's deputies.

The revelation about the dinner party came as authorities probed whether the shooter had any accomplices.

"We're finding out what took place, whether it's one person or a number of people," President Donald Trump told reporters. "We'll get to the bottom of it very quickly.

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