Quantcast
Connect with us

National Rifle Association endorses Mitt Romney

Published

on

FISHERSVILLE, Virginia — The National Rifle Association, the biggest gun rights lobby in the United States, announced Thursday its endorsement of Republican Mitt Romney for president.

“I am proud to have their support for my candidacy, and when I am president, I will do all in my power to defend and protect the right of all law-abiding Americans to keep and bear arms,” Romney said in a statement.

ADVERTISEMENT

NRA Political Victory Fund chair Chris Cox said it was important to have “a friend of our Second Amendment freedoms and hunting heritage in the White House,” referring to the part of the US Constitution which enshrines the right to bear arms.

“Today we live in an America… led by a president who mocks our values, belittles our faith, and is threatened by our freedom,” said Cox in Fishersville, Virginia, where Romney and his running mate Paul Ryan, a congressman and avid hunter, attended a rally.

“So on behalf of the four million men and women of the National Rifle Association, representing tens of millions of NRA supporters, it is my honor to announce the NRA’s endorsement of Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan,” Cox said in a statement.

Obama incurred the wrath of conservatives and gun owners in April 2008 when, as a Democratic presidential candidate, he told donors in liberal California that amid economic decline, some people “get bitter (and) cling to guns or religion.”

NRA executive vice president Wayne LaPierre spoke of the tight Obama-Romney race playing out in Virginia, “the front line of this election.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“This is where the race could be won or lost,” he said. “This is where gun owners must make that difference.”

Gun control has not emerged as a campaign issue this year despite tragedies including the 2011 shooting of congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords at a political event in Arizona in which six people died, and the shooting at a Colorado theater during a screening of a Batman movie in July that left 12 people dead.

A survivor of the Colorado shooting made an advertisement this week calling for the candidates to finally address gun violence, as has New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, but the issue has received scant attention on the campaign trail.

ADVERTISEMENT

The NRA’s support of Romney is somewhat controversial in that Romney once favored a toughening of some gun laws. In 2004, while governor of Massachusetts, he signed off on a permanent assault weapons ban for the state.

“These guns are not made for recreation or self-defense,” Romney said at a July 1, 2004 signing ceremony, according to non-profit group Media Matters, which posted a copy of a state press release on its website.

ADVERTISEMENT

“They are instruments of destruction with the sole purpose of hunting down and killing people,” Romney said.

Romney’s 2012 political platform, however, states that “Mitt does not believe that the United States needs additional laws that restrict the Second Amendment right to keep and bear arms.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2012

Coronavirus is fostering a culture of no touching — a psychologist explains why that’s a problem

Published

on

Touch has profound benefits for human beings. But over the last few decades, people have becomeincreasingly cautious about socially touching others for a range of reasons. With the novel coronavirus spreading, this is bound to get worse. People have already started avoiding shaking hands. And the British queen was seen wearing gloves as a precautionnot to contract the virus.The coronavirus could very well have long-term implications for how hands-on we are – reinforcing already existing perceptions that touch should be avoided.Why is touch so important? It helps us share how we feel about othe... (more…)

Continue Reading

2012

North Carolina is a delegate prize on Super Tuesday. But it’s a complicated one

Published

on

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Only two states have more Democratic delegates at stake than North Carolina on Super Tuesday. But who will get them?Well, it’s complicated.— It depends not just on how many votes a candidate gets but where he or she gets them.— In a sense, candidates still in the race will be competing with those who’ve dropped out.— And regardless of the primary outcome, so-called automatic delegates — once known as superdelegates — can support whoever they want.“Of course it’s complicated,” said University of Virginia political scientist Larry Sabato. “It doesn’t have to be that complicated... (more…)

Continue Reading
 

2012

Swing State poll shows Trump beating every Democrat in Wisconsin

Published

on

A new swing state poll released Thursday shows President Donald Trump beating every Democratic candidate in a head-to-head match-up in Wisconsin, but trailing behind in Michigan and Pennsylvania.In Wisconsin, Trump leads each candidate 7-11%:Trump/former Vice President Joe Biden — 49% to 42%Trump/billionaire Mike Bloomberg – 49% to 41%Trump/former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg — 49% to 41%Trump/Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota) — 50% to 39%Trump/Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) — 50% to 43%Trump/Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) — 51% to 41%In Pennsylvania, Trump trails the candidates by... (more…)

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image