Quantcast
Connect with us

U.S. civil rights groups ask international election monitors for assistance

Published

on

NAACP and others say voter restrictions and ID laws ahead of 2012 US election require planned observer mission to expand

American civil rights groups have appealed to the world’s biggest election monitoring organisation over concerns about controversial changes in voter registration ahead of the November 6 White House poll.

The eight civil rights group expressed their worry that millions, including those on low income as well as minorities, could be excluded from the vote for the presidency and for members of Congress.

ADVERTISEMENT

They raised the issues during a meeting on Tuesday in Washington with representatives from the Organisation of Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE), which represents 56 states in Europe, Central Asia and North America.

The OSCE is likely to refer to the concerns in an interim report on the US elections out at the end of next week. It is also expected to pass on the views of the civil rights groups to its team of international observers who are being sent to monitor elections in 40 states.

The OSCE opened its observer mission in the US on October 9, led by OSCE ambassador Daan Everts. It has 13 international experts based in DC and 44 long-term observers from 23 countries being deployed throughout the country.

Its mission is to assess the election for compliance with international obligations and standards for democratic elections.

In a statement, it said: “The mission will analyse the legislative framework and its implementation and will follow campaign activities, the work of the election administration and relevant government bodies, including voter registration, and the resolution of election disputes.’

ADVERTISEMENT

The eight civil rights groups, who include the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and the NAACP, asked the OSCE to send election monitors to the states most affected by voter restrictions.

They cited new restrictions on voting periods and voter ID laws aimed at disenfranchising women, the young, the elderly and disabled, as well as minorities and those on low income.

The states identified as places they would like to see observers deployed are Pennsylvania, Ohio, Florida, Texas and Wisconsin.

ADVERTISEMENT

The OSCE, as well as issuing interim reports before the election, will also publish its finding immediately after the election and a more considered verdict a few months later.

© Guardian News and Media 2012

ADVERTISEMENT

[“Voting day in a small town” by Liz West via Flickr, Creative Commons licensed]


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2012

Coronavirus is fostering a culture of no touching — a psychologist explains why that’s a problem

Published

on

Touch has profound benefits for human beings. But over the last few decades, people have becomeincreasingly cautious about socially touching others for a range of reasons. With the novel coronavirus spreading, this is bound to get worse. People have already started avoiding shaking hands. And the British queen was seen wearing gloves as a precautionnot to contract the virus.The coronavirus could very well have long-term implications for how hands-on we are – reinforcing already existing perceptions that touch should be avoided.Why is touch so important? It helps us share how we feel about othe... (more…)

Continue Reading

2012

North Carolina is a delegate prize on Super Tuesday. But it’s a complicated one

Published

on

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Only two states have more Democratic delegates at stake than North Carolina on Super Tuesday. But who will get them?Well, it’s complicated.— It depends not just on how many votes a candidate gets but where he or she gets them.— In a sense, candidates still in the race will be competing with those who’ve dropped out.— And regardless of the primary outcome, so-called automatic delegates — once known as superdelegates — can support whoever they want.“Of course it’s complicated,” said University of Virginia political scientist Larry Sabato. “It doesn’t have to be that complicated... (more…)

Continue Reading
 

2012

Swing State poll shows Trump beating every Democrat in Wisconsin

Published

on

A new swing state poll released Thursday shows President Donald Trump beating every Democratic candidate in a head-to-head match-up in Wisconsin, but trailing behind in Michigan and Pennsylvania.In Wisconsin, Trump leads each candidate 7-11%:Trump/former Vice President Joe Biden — 49% to 42%Trump/billionaire Mike Bloomberg – 49% to 41%Trump/former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg — 49% to 41%Trump/Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-Minnesota) — 50% to 39%Trump/Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) — 50% to 43%Trump/Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Massachusetts) — 51% to 41%In Pennsylvania, Trump trails the candidates by... (more…)

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image