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Dementia cost expected to more than double by 2040: study

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Dementia costs more each year in the United States than cancer or heart disease, with annual costs ranging from $157 billion to $215 billion, according to a study released Wednesday.

Much of the costs come from long-term care giving, and the price tag is expected to more than double by 2040, said the study by the non-profit RAND Corporation in the April 4 edition of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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“The economic burden of caring for people in the United States with dementia is large and growing larger,” said Michael Hurd, the study’s lead author and a senior economist at RAND.

“Our findings underscore the urgency of recent federal efforts to develop a coordinated plan to address the growing impact of dementia on American society.”

Some 5.3 million Americans currently suffer from Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

By 2050, the number of people with Alzheimer’s is expected to more than double because of the aging population, the CDC has said.

President Barack Obama signed into law the National Alzheimer’s Project Act in 2011, which aims in part to track the costs of dementia for government and society.

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Dementia affects about 15 percent of people over 70 and is estimated to cost society between $41,000 and $56,000 per person every year, the New England Journal of Medicine study said.

“Our calculations suggest that the aging of the US population will result in an increase of nearly 80 percent in total societal costs per adult by 2040,” it said.

“Our estimate places dementia among the diseases that are the most costly to society.”

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When researchers considered just direct health care expenditures, and not the cost of informal care, dementia cost about $109 billion per year compared to $102 billion in 2010 for heart disease. Cancer costs about $77 billion.

Informal care for patients with dementia drives the cost even higher, experts said.

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“Much of the expense is informal care and out of pocket expenses,” said Mary Sano, director of the Alzheimer Disease Research Center at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York.

Government assistance in the form of Medicare pays only about 10 percent of the costs per year, added Sano, who was not involved with the study.

“Out of pocket or replacement care is the major burden born by families of those with dementia.”

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The RAND study’s estimate of total cost was lower than the Alzheimer’s Association’s recent estimate of $172 billion in 2010 dollars, likely due to a higher population prevalence given by the AA and a failure to adjust for the cost of co-existing conditions, the article said.


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‘Rather than leading — he lies’: MSNBC panel says Trump is a ‘danger to the country’ because he can’t be trusted

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MSNBC commentators, former assistant US Attorney Maya Wiley and Rick Wilson, explained that President Donald Trump's most significant barrier is making it past his own lies to save America from the coronavirus.

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Trump ‘just wants this problem to go away’: President desperate to get coronavirus ‘off his plate’

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President Donald Trump is desperate for the coronavirus problem to go away, and he doesn't exactly care how it happens.

According to New York Times reporter Annie Karni, sources are telling her that the biggest concern Trump has is more about the markets than the deaths of Americans from the virus.

"First, let's establish, this is a president who tried to change science with a Sharpie when it came to hurricane path prediction," said MSNBC host Brian Williams. "That picture lasts forever."

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Seth Meyers: You know Trump isn’t the chief law enforcement officer because he couldn’t pass the physical

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"Late Night" host Seth Meyers warned that the United States is sliding into authoritarianism under President Donald Trump.

Sounding the alarm Wednesday evening, Meyers cited reports that Trump was making lists of disloyal people, purging them from their jobs, hiring unqualified cronies in top posts, and claiming he has the right to interfere in criminal cases.

While speaking to the press last week, Trump even announced that he's allowed to be involved in all criminal cases because he's the chief law enforcement officer of the United States. It's actually a title used for the attorney general.

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