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WATCH: ‘Living natural man’ berates Montana judge over not having a fishing license

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A 52-year-old Montana man who repeatedly called himself a “living natural man” was found guilty on Friday of obstructing a police officer and resisting arrest, putting an end to a series of heated encounters between himself and a judge he accused of acting like a “privateer.”

KAJ-TV reported that Ernie Wayne Tertelgte was removed from the trial before the jury was selected, amid his insistence that Judge Wanda Drusch had no authority to try him.

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“Why — please, give me an honorable answer — is a British-recognized esquire asking questions in an American courtroom?” Tertelgte asked Drusch. He then refused to follow bailiffs’ instructions to stand up, saying, “If I stand up, I give you recognition,” and saying he was “constrained by the United States Constitution of 1789.”

Tertelgte was charged in connection with an Aug. 31 encounter with state game warden Adam Pankratz, who tried to cite him for fishing without a license at a state lake. When the suspect refused to identify himself, Pankratz called police for assistance. However, Pankratz said in court, Tertelgte still refused and repeatedly told the officers to “walk away.”

KBZK-TV reported that Tertelgte and Drusch also argued during a hearing earlier this month, with Tertelgte saying, “I am the living man, protected by natural law” and pointing at the U.S. flag while telling Drusch, “That is the Jolly Roger. That thing you call the American flag with the golf fringe around it is the Jolly Roger, and you are acting as one of its privateers.”

Tertelgte’s remarks seemingly mirror the rhetoric used by members of the “Sovereign Citizens Movement,” which supporters argue that they alone can decide which laws to obey and which to ignore. The Southern Poverty Law Center has reported that “sovereigns” believe that the American governnment “was secretly replaced by a new government system based on admiralty law, the law of the sea and international commerce. Under common law, or so they believe, the sovereigns would be free men. Under admiralty law, they are slaves, and secret government forces have a vested interest in keeping them that way.”

Watch KAJ’s report, aired on Saturday, below.

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And watch raw footage of Tertelgte’s earlier appearance in court, posted by KBZK on Nov. 19, below.

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‘I think I made a mistake’: Patient who thought pandemic was a ‘hoax’ dies after going to ‘COVID party’

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According to WOAI, a patient in San Antonio, Texas in their 30s has died after going to a "COVID party" — a gathering of people who intentionally expose themselves to coronavirus to see for themselves whether the virus is real.

Per Methodist Healthcare Chief Medical Officer Dr. Jane Appleby, the patient's final words to the nurse were, "I think I made a mistake, I thought this was a hoax, but it’s not."

“It doesn’t discriminate and none of us are invincible,” warned Appleby. “I don’t want to be an alarmist and we’re just trying to share some real-world examples to help our community realize that this virus is very serious and can spread easily.”

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Trump balked at full pardon for Roger Stone over fears of Justice Department ‘backlash’: CNN legal analyst

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President Donald Trump's former political strategist Roger Stone claims that he asked for a commutation of his prison sentence, rather than a full pardon, because a pardon would have implied an acknowledgement of guilt whereas a commutation would still allow him to seek for the original conviction to be thrown out.

But on CNN Saturday, criminal defense attorney Page Pate suggested it may have played out differently: Stone may have actually wanted a full pardon, but Trump was spooked out of offering one.

"Page, this situation, I guess, is not entirely surprising. It's been signaled for some time," said correspondent Abby Phillip. "But what is different about this, I think a lot of people were expecting a pardon here. Roger Stone said he wanted his sentence commuted because he didn't want to admit guilt. What is the significance of that?"

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Expert explains how ‘hate speech and disinformation flow on Facebook’

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Janine Jackson interviewed Free Press’s Jessica González about Facebook promoting hate for the July 3, 2020, episode of CounterSpin. This is a lightly edited transcript.

You can listen here.

Janine Jackson: Civil rights and social justice groups have been grappling for years with ways to address hateful speech, harassment and disinformation on Facebook. The issue is on the front burner again, as major companies like Unilever and Starbucks are pausing their ads—the platform’s source of revenue—as part of a coordinated effort to get Facebook to change policies that allow politicians and others to make false and incendiary claims.

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