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Actors Jake Gyllenhaal and Josh Brolin in Nepal to shoot Everest film ‘Into Thin Air’

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Hollywood actors Jake Gyllenhaal and Josh Brolin have arrived in Nepal to shoot a new film based on the Everest bestseller “Into Thin Air”, a government official said Monday.

Brolin and Gyllenhaal, who are staying at a five-star hotel in Kathmandu, will play the lead roles in the film, named “Everest”, which will focus on an ill-fated attempt to scale the world’s tallest mountain in 1996.

Iceland’s Baltasar Kormakur is directing the film, which tells the story of how eight climbers lost their lives when a rogue storm struck the mountain.

“A local agent applied for permission on behalf of Baltasar Kormakur to shoot ‘Everest’ and received the permission three days ago,” communications ministry official Umakant Parajuli told AFP.

Parajuli said the team was permitted to shoot in the Himalayan nation for two weeks.

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He declined to comment on whether the shoot would include a stint on the famed peak this month, when temperatures are expected to be at their lowest level annually.

British newspaper The Guardian reported last week that Gyllenhaal would play Scott Fisher, a US expedition leader who died in the disaster while Brolin will play Beck Weathers, an American doctor who survived the storm.

US mountaineering journalist Jon Krakauer, who accompanied the Everest climbers on their ascent, wrote about the tragedy in his 1997 bestseller.

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Hundreds of climbers scale the peak every spring, while thousands more go trekking from Lukla, the nearest airport, to Everest base camp.

Last year, a brawl between three European climbers and Nepalese guides on Everest hit global headlines, raising concerns that the mountain had become too crowded in recent years with climbers eager to set new records.


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OAN’s Kremlin journalist proves the ‘merger between Russian state-sponsored propaganda and American conservative media’ is complete: Former FBI special agent

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Its headlines look like they're written to please an audience of one.

"Political Strategist: President Trump’s reelection looks good in state-by-state analysis of chances."

"Pres. Trump touts strong approval rating as economy remains solid."

"GOP businesswoman Scherie Murray announces campaign for AOC’s seat."

It's been called an "obscure" pay-cable TV station, but One America News Network, which at time feels more like Fox News than Fox News, is President Donald Trump's new favorite news channel. It worked hard to get there, and as a 2017 Washington Post article noted its "taking ‘pro-Trump’ to new heights."

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Here’s the insidious role Sean Hannity played in derailing Al Franken’s political career

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The U.S. Senate lost one of its most prominent liberals when Sen. Al Franken of Minnesota, dogged by sexual harassment allegations, announced his resignation in December 2017. Some of Franken’s defenders believed the Democratic Party was too quick to throw him under the bus; other Democrats stressed that in light of the #MeToo movement, his resignation was absolutely necessary. Franken’s political downfall is the subject of an in-depth report by the New Yorker’s Jane Mayer, who describes — among many other things — the role that Fox News’ Sean Hannity played in the media firestorm.

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The media got it wrong: There’s no evidence GOP support for Trump improved after his racist outburst

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One of the most popular articles last week involved claims that polls showed Republicans had increased their support of President Trump.  But a closer analysis of the data reveals that any increase in support was within the margin of error.  So the polls couldn’t conclude that GOP support for President Trump had gone up or down.

Polls are tricky creatures.  We either give them near god-like status, or discount them entirely, often depending on whether they show us what we want.

I remember the movie “Machete,” where an opportunistic Texas politician fakes his own shooting.  Within five minutes of that story breaking, the news anchor reported that the politician had drastically improved his standing in the polls.  Surveys don’t work that way.

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