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‘Photography is not a crime:’ Kansas teen charged after filming cops speeding

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A Topeka, Kansas teenager pleaded not guilty Monday to charges of inattentive driving and having a television receiver in front of him while driving, after filming police officers citing him for a traffic stop he complained were speeding.

Addison Mikkelson, 17, made headlines last year after he filmed police arresting him for jaywalking. In that video, displayed below, he asked officers what he was being charged with and his camera was thrown to the ground. Officers said he was “obstructing justice,” though the video seemed to suggest they were unhappy with his recording the incident.

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On Monday, he plead not guilty to new charges. In a second video he posted Sunday, he filmed a patrol car allegedly speeding and failing to use a turn signal, and then was pulled over for what police say was inattentive driving and driving behind a television receiver. No receiver is shown.

Mikkelson told the Topeka Capital-Journal he made the film to protect himself.

“I’m not stopping,” he said. “Photography is not a crime. I’m trying to hold people accountable for their actions.”

“It’s pure harassment, I think,” his mother added.

Mikkelson received another citation for “not stopping before pulling out a drive” Feb. 16. Since he wasn’t recording at the time, he said he couldn’t prove his innocence and opted to accept the court’s $142 fine.

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In his latest video, where he seemed to catch police speeding and not using a turn signal, the Kansas teen didn’t display particular tact.

“You are a loser,” he told one of the officers. “You are a loser.”

His trial has been set for April 7.

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Mikkelson’s video of his being cited for driving behind a television receiver and inattentive driving:

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Mikkelson being arrested after allegedly jaywalking:

[Photo credit: Shutterstock]

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Newly revealed letter details Rudy Giuliani’s work for Fraud Guarantee company owned by indicted henchman

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A newly revealed letter sheds light on Rudy Giuliani's work for Fraud Guarantee, a company founded by his indicted associates Lev Parnas and David Correia -- and the document has been handed over to investigators.

Fraud Guarantee circulated an investor letter last year that shows the company would pay the consulting firm Giuliani Partners up to $2 million for the first year and give the former New York City mayor equity in the company, reported the Wall Street Journal.

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‘Where’s Melania?’ The View hosts blister first lady for ignoring ‘bully-in-chief’ Trump’s attack on Greta Thunberg

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A discussion on Donald Trump's bitter Twitter attack on 16-year-old environmentalist Greta Thunberg, after she aced him out of Time Magazine's Person of the Year, caught the attention of the panelists on The View, who hammered both the president and the first lady after they both protested the mention of their teen son Barron just weeks ago.

After co-host Joy Behar read the president's tweet from Thursday morning where he proclaimed, "So ridiculous. Greta must work on her Anger Management problem, then go to a good old fashioned movie with a friend! Chill Greta, Chill!" she called the president out for being jealous of the teen for getting the Time magazine cover he so desperately wanted.

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Matt Gaetz probably isn’t the best to go after someone’s drug use: Internet cautions Republican Congressman

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) probably isn't the best person to make an argument against driving under the influence given his own arrests. Even Rep Hank Johnson (D-GA) cautioned against "the pot calling the kettle black," during the Thursday House Judiciary Committee hearing.

Gaetz was arrested for a DUI in 2008 on suspicion of a DUI after he refused a field sobriety test and a breathalyzer test. Just two years later he was elected to the Florida state legislature and by 2016 he was in Congress.

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