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‘Atheist creationists’ say their study proves there is no Jesus in your communion wafer

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A DNA analysis proves that Holy Communion is a “fraud,” according to a hedonistic religious sect that believes humans were created by extraterrestrials about 25,000 years ago.

The Association of Raelian Scientists published a study on October 25 they say refutes the Catholic claim of transubstantiation, in which bread and wine and actually become the physical body and blood of Jesus Christ.

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“Nobody can contest a simple DNA test like that conducted by our scientists,” Brigitte Boisselier, spokesperson for the Raelian Movement, said in a news release. “Supernatural statements of long-established organizations like the Catholic Church can be exposed for what they are, a poor sham from the Middle Ages that has no place in this new century. All scientists should educate the public.”

The Raelian movement was founded in the 1970s by former French auto racing journalist Claude Vorilhon, who changed his name to Rael after a “dramatic encounter” with extraterrestrial human beings. Raelians believe these humans from another planet — not a divine being — created all forms of life on Earth.

“Yet there’s a very important difference between most atheists and the Raelians: We’re still Creationists! The Raelian Movement is an atheistic religion that is preparing humanity to welcome back its true creators, the Elohim, without fear or guilt.”

The Raelian researchers collected consecrated hosts from five different Catholic churches in the United States and Canada, and then tested the samples for human DNA.

“But DNA analysis performed on five different hosts collected after the Catholic ritual of consecration showed no DNA change whatsoever in them,” Boisselier explained. “The wheat DNA remained wheat DNA, with no human DNA present other than that resulting from contamination caused by human handling of the hosts. This study clearly falsifies the claim that a religious ritual performed by a priest can actually change the substance of a bread wafer into the substance of a human body.”

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The authors of the study acknowledged they used deception to obtain the consecrated hosts, but said their research was justified because Catholic indoctrination had long-lasting negative consequences.

They also wrote their research was “by no means an attack on religion, but rather a small step in the refutation of superstition and irrational beliefs.”

“Religions can have important social benefits, and even more so when they evolve with scientific knowledge and update their claims and beliefs accordingly,” the authors concluded.

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Trump rages at Twitter — but the social media outlet fears public opinion more than it fears the president

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In a landmark action, Twitter has for the first time attached independent fact-checking information directly to two tweets from President Donald Trump. The president’s tweets make false claims alleging that wider use of mail in ballots will result in an increase in voter fraud.

This is far from the first time Trump has posted falsehoods on Twitter. But it is the first time the social media company has taken action against his account.

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‘I’m entitled’: Kayleigh McEnany defends her 11 mail-in votes while calling it ‘fraud’ for the masses

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White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Thursday faced questions from Fox News about why she had voted by mail 11 times even though President Donald Trump has called absentee ballots a "scam."

McEnany was asked about her voting history after the Tampa Bay Times reported that she had used mail-in voting nearly a dozen times in recent years.

"So why is it OK for you to do it?" Fox News host Ed Henry asked McEnany. "I understand you are traveling, you're in a different city. But how can you really be assured that your votes were counted accurately but when other people do it, it's fraud."

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‘They want their civil war’: Far-right ‘boogaloo’ militants have embedded themselves in the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis

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Young, white men dressed in Hawaiian-style print shirts and body armor, and carrying high-powered rifles have been a notable feature at state capitols, lending an edgy and even sometimes insurrectionary tone to gatherings of conservatives angered by restrictions on businesses and church gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic.

Just as many states are reopening their economies — and taking the wind out of the conservative protests — the boogaloo movement found a new galvanizing cause: the protests in Minneapolis against the police killing of George Floyd.

A new iteration of the militia movement, boogaloo was born out of internet forums for gun enthusiasts that repurposed the 1984 movie Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo as a code for a second civil war, and then modified it into phrases like “big luau” to create an insular community for those in on the joke, with Hawaiian-style shirts functioning as an in-real-life identifier. Boogaloo gained currency as an internet meme over the summer of 2019, when it was adopted by white supremacists in the accelerationist tendency. In January, the movement made the leap from the internet to the streets when a group boogaloo-ers showed up at the Second Amendment rally in Richmond, Va.

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