Quantcast
Connect with us

SpaceX Falcon returns to Earth after International Space Station cargo run

Published

on

SpaceX’s unmanned Dragon spacecraft left the International Space Station and returned to Earth on Saturday after a month in orbit, NASA said.

Astronauts at the orbiting lab manipulated the space station’s robotic arm to detach the Dragon on time, at 9:57 am (1357 GMT), in what the US space agency called a “very clean release.”

The capsule splashed down five and a half hours later, at 3:39 (1939 GMT) in the Pacific Ocean, near the Mexican coast, slowed by three enormous parachutes.

The unmanned craft, which has been docked in orbit since September 23, ferried back some 3,200 pounds (1,450 kilograms) of materials, including results from experiments conducted on the space station.

It also carried crew supplies, hardware, and computer resources.

The SpaceX vessel is the only spacecraft currently capable of returning with cargo. Its last mission to ISS was in April.

ADVERTISEMENT

It had delivered more than 5,000 pounds (2,200 kilograms) of cargo, including freeze-dried meals, 20 live lab mice and a 3D printer, in its fourth contracted mission to the orbiting lab.

The lab mice are the first live mammals to hitch a ride aboard a commercial cargo ship, and they are enclosed in a NASA-made research cage for studying the effects of weightlessness on their bodies.

The 3-D printer is the first of its kind to demonstrate how the technology can be used in space, even without gravity to assist the process.

The Dragon return Saturday kicks off a week of heavy traffic to and from the orbiting science lab.

ADVERTISEMENT

Monday evening, Orbital Sciences is scheduled to launch its unmanned Cygnus capsule from the Wallops Island space center, on the coast of Virginia, and should arrive November 2 at ISS at the same dock that held Dragon.

And on Wednesday, a Russian cargo ship, Progress, is set to take off for ISS, taking the place of a sister Russian vessel that is to break away from the orbiting station and return to Earth on Monday.

And looking a few weeks further, three of the six ISS crew members are already preparing to leave the lab after 165 days in orbit. They are set to ride in a Russian Soyuz craft on Sunday, November 9th.

Their three replacements, a Russian and two Americans, should arrive on November 23.

ADVERTISEMENT

NASA lost its ability to reach the space station when the shuttle program ended in 2011 after 30 years.

The US space agency has helped fund private companies in the race to restore US access to the ISS.

In 2010, SpaceX became the first private company to send a spacecraft to the ISS.

The company is run by Internet mogul Elon Musk, who built his fortune by co-founding PayPal. He also runs Tesla Motors.SpaceX craft re

Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Ex-prosecutor slams Congress for not jailing subpoena violators in the Trump administration: ‘It’s incomprehensible’

Published

on

House Democrats have been blocked at every turn from their lawful oversight functions as President Donald Trump's administration directs its members to ignore subpoenas for information on a variety of topics, from the Russia investigation to the census.

On Thursday, former federal prosecutor Glenn Kirschner castigated Democrats for their unwillingness to use their biggest weapon in the subpoena fight: inherent contempt.

It’s incomprehensible that Congress appears unwilling to use its lawful inherent contempt powers to force the issue of administration members ignoring properly issued subpoenas. Like a football team refusing to pass the ball, forever running up the middle, gaining zero yards. https://t.co/AaWvEsJvk2

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s campaign is a perpetual outrage machine designed to inflame ‘every f-cking deplorable’ in America

Published

on

President Donald Trump's re-election campaign is gambling on an unprecedented strategy by focusing entirely on his base, while making little or no effort to attract new supporters.

The president still hasn't cracked 50 percent approval in two and a half years in the White House, and his 2020 campaign was built around a perpetual outrage machine designed to inflame his core supporters -- and drive them to the polls, reported TIME.

The campaign uses Google and Facebook algorithms to make massive digital advertising purchases any time Trump stirs up controversy, and scoops up data when supporters interact with those ads or buy online merchandise from the Trump campaign website.

Continue Reading
 

Facebook

Putin says use of US force against Iran would be ‘disaster’

Published

on

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday said any use of force by the US against Iran would lead to disaster as tensions escalate between Washington and Tehran.

"The US says it does not rule out the use of force... This would be a disaster for the region," Putin said during an annual televised phone-in with screened questions posed by Russian viewers.

"It would lead to a surge in violence and an increase in the number of refugees," he said, adding that the consequences of intervention would be "difficult to calculate".

Moscow has backed Tehran in its stand off with the United States since Washington pulled out of an international 2015 nuclear agreement with Iran last year.

Continue Reading
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

I need your help.

Investigating Trump's henchmen is a full time job, and I'm trying to bring in new team members to do more exclusive reports. We have more stories coming you'll love. Join me and help restore the power of hard-hitting progressive journalism.

TAKE A LOOK
close-link

Investigating Trump is a full-time job, and I want to add new team members to do more exclusive reports. We have stories coming you'll love. Join me and go ad-free, while restoring the power of hard-hitting progressive journalism.

TAKE A LOOK
close-link