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Teen pop star’s single ‘Royals’ banned in San Francisco as World Series looms

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Pop singer Lorde has become an unwitting part of the buildup for this year’s World Series, with radio stations in San Francisco and Kansas City jousting over her hit “Royals.”

According to Rolling Stone, two San Francisco stations KOIT-FM and KFOG announced, they will stop playing the song, since the 17-year-old New Zealand native has admitted to being inspired to write the song by Kansas City Royals great George Brett.

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“I had this image of this dude just signing baseballs,” she explained. “His shirt said ‘Royals,’ it was just that word.”

Deadspin reported that the picture in question was a 1976 National Geographic photo of Brett signing autographs. The chance connection led to Brett meeting Lorde, and the team adopting her song as a sort of unofficial theme.

In response, KOIT’s sister station in Kansas City said it would play “Royals” at the top of the hour every hour.

“I respect the work of Mr. Brian Figula, 96.5 KOIT program director, and his team of broadcast professionals, but we won’t let their anti-Royals spirit ruin this moment,” KZPT general manager Tony Lorino said in a statement. “A few angry San Franciscans who don’t have a song called ‘Giants’ won’t rain on our parade.”

The series begins on Tuesday. No bet has been announced between San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee and Kansas City Mayor Sylvester “Sly” James, but two Democratic lawmakers, Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D-MO) did place a wager; McClatchy reported that Pelosi has put “a basket of San Francisco’s finest chocolates” up against a “President’s Tray” barbeque order from Gates Bar B.Q.

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New Zealand epidemiologist: ‘We look at Trump’s behavior and we’re horrified’

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To learn how New Zealand has largely eliminated COVID-19, we continue our extended interview with Michael Baker, an epidemiologist who is a member of the New Zealand Ministry of Health’s Technical Advisory Group and advising the government on its response to the COVID-19 pandemic. He describes how the country’s response compares to the government actions in the United States and worldwide.

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The Quarantine Report. I’m Amy Goodman, with Juan González, as we bring you Part 2 of our discussion of New Zealand.

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Trump White House hammered for covering up their own economic projections as jobs vanish

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The Trump White House has decided against releasing midyear economic projections this summer, breaking precedent at a time when unemployment is expected to top 20 percent.

The Washington Post reports that the administration is not releasing updated economic projections that "would almost certainly codify an administration assessment that the coronavirus pandemic has led to a severe economic downturn" with massive job losses that have topped 36 million in just two months.

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Joe Scarborough can sue for defamation — and ‘it could require Mr. Trump to pay substantial punitive damages’: Legal expert

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MSNBC's Joe Scarborough may have a defamation case against President Donald Trump, according to one legal expert.

Peter Schuck, an emeritus professor of law at Yale and visiting professor at the University of California, Berkeley, laid out the case against the president in a new column for the New York Times.

"Trump’s wantonly cruel tweets about the tragic death in 2001 of Lori Klausutis are distinctive," Schuck writes. "They may constitute intentional torts for which a civil jury could award punitive damages against him."

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