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WATCH: Native activists sing in Senate to celebrate Keystone XL bill’s failure

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The failure of a bill supporting the Keystone XL pipeline in the Senate brought about a celebratory song from Native American demonstrators in the chamber, according to video posted online on Tuesday.

The footage shows Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) presiding over the Senate and moving to move to executive session when she is interrupted by one protester, identified by the Washington Post as Greg Graycloud of the Lakota Tribe in South Dakota.

The bill garnered 59 votes in support, one short of the number needed to pass. Fourteen Democrats joined 45 Republicans in voting for the pipeline.

Warren quickly called for the sergeant-at-arms to “restore order.” An independent journalist, Radical Media, reported that five protesters were arrested in all and taken from the Senate chamber.

After Graycloud’s song, other protesters chanted, “Senator Landrieu, whatcha gonna do?,” a reference to Sen. Mary Landrieu’s (D-LA) attempt to gather the 60 votes needed for the bill to pass. Landrieu is currently headed for a runoff election next month against Republican Bill Cassidy.

Another activist group, DC Action Lab, posted a picture online from outside Sen. Michael Bennet’s (D-CO) office, saying they were threatened with arrest if they did not stop singing.

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While lawmakers have debated on whether to move forward on the Keystone pipeline, both environmental activists and Native American tribes have spoken out against it. On Monday, the president of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, Cyril Scott, said in a statement that his group was “outraged” by a House vote last week approving the project.

“We are a sovereign nation and we are not being treated as such,” Scott said. “We will close our reservation borders to Keystone XL. Authorizing Keystone XL is an act of war against our people.”

Watch the video, as posted online, below.

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Republican analyst says Trump is ‘threatened by’ being challenged by women: ‘It hurts his ego’

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According to one Republican commentator, President Donald Trump's decision to lash out at four Congresswomen of color stems from his inability to handle being challenged by women.

In a segment with MSNBC host Ali Velshi, Rina Shah, who runs Republican Women for Progress, said that she's been the target of racist attacks from Trump supporters ever since she announced she wouldn't support him.

"I believe that what this president is doing is fanning the flames," she said. "He cannot denounce white supremacy, white nationalism. This is a moment in which he could have kept his mouth shut. You know, this tit-for-tat with [Speaker Nancy] Pelosi (D-CA) and 'The Squad,' he didn’t need to engage in it. If I was advising the president, if I were one of his advisers, I would have said stay out of it. But he doesn't listen to anyone around him."

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Shep Smith goes off on Trump’s racist attacks: ‘A misleading and xenophobic eruption of distraction and division’

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Fox News newsman Shep Smith began his Monday show by calling President Donald Trump's racist comments about four congresswomen of color "xenophobic" and a "distraction" for the purpose of "division."

"Our reporting begins with President Trump’s latest misleading and xenophobic eruption of distraction and division," Smith opened with. "Directed this time at a group of minority women in the United States Congress. 'Go back to where you came from,' that is what the president wrote on Twitter just yesterday and today he called them haters of America and Jews. The president is defending those statements and when asked if he thought the tweets might be racist, his response, 'Not at all.'"

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Even neo-Nazis think Trump’s racism ‘goes too far sometimes’: Investigative reporter

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An investigative reporter that has embedded with neo-Nazis and Klan members explained Monday that President Donald Trump’s language echoes what these far-right groups have been saying for years.

In an MSNBC panel discussion, Vegas Tenold explained that when Trump says things like this it's almost expected at this point because he's been saying racist things since the birther campaign.

"He’s a racist; we have known for a long time that he is a racist," Tenold said. "'Go back to where you came from,' it’s peak racism, it’s, you know, the original form of racism. He’s been on this thing for a long time."

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