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Bill Maher slams ‘evil, ruthless’ Monsanto: ‘The Scientologists of the corporate world’

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In an interview with MauiNow.com, comedian Bill Maher took a moment to congratulate activists on the island of Maui who managed to prevent biotech giant Monsanto from carrying out its plans to grow GMO crops there.

On Nov. 4, voters in Maui County heeded warnings by the Sustainable Hawaiian Agriculture for the Keiki and the ‘Aina (SHAKA) Movement and voted to suspend the growth, testing and cultivation of GMO crops on the island.

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When MauiNow.com’s Vanessa Wolf asked about Maher’s thoughts on the electoral victory, he said, “All I can say to the folks on Maui who were a part of this is ‘You go, girl!’ That’s fantastic.”

He continued, “I’m jealous. We tried to do something like that in California a couple years ago. In that case, we weren’t asking Monsanto to change anything. We were just asking that they let us know: Give us the information, label the products, so we can decide for ourselves.”

“Well, of course, a company like Monsanto,” he said, “which owns all the great lobbyists in the world, went to work and they convinced people that it would cost them more money at the grocery store. It was a disingenuous and dishonest thing to say, but it worked and people voted it down.”

“But we’ll be back again,” vowed the Real Time host. “These things always take more than one time — medical marijuana, legal marijuana, gay marriage — it takes a while before people get used to an idea. They’ll get used to this, and we’ll have success.”

“Monsanto is – from my point of view – the most evil company in the world,” he said, “and that’s saying something in a world that also includes ExxonMobil, pharmaceutical companies, defense department companies and all sorts of merchants of death. Monsanto has the potential to REALLY f*ck with all of us.”

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He concluded, “And they’re ruthless. They’re the Scientologists of the corporate world. I worry a lot about Monsanto, honestly, and I suppose my advice would be don’t bring a knife to a gun fight.”


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2020 Election

So long, Steve King: 9-term white supremacist GOP congressman from Iowa loses primary

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U.S. Congressman Steve King, a nine-term Republican of Iowa, has just lost his primary to a GOP challenger. It's a huge fall from grace: In 2014 The Des Moines Register labeled the former earth-moving company founder a "presidential kingmaker."

But his racist, white nationalist, white supremacist, anti-immigrant, anti-Semitic, homophobic, transphobic, biphobic remarks and disturbing ties to far right radical European politicians – including one he endorsed who has ties to a neo-Nazi, finally caught up with him.

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When the president’s son-in-law truly was a great success

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For many Americans, the idea of the president tasking his son-in-law with solving national, even international, crises, seems problematic, if not absurd. But it happened once before and turned out to be the kind of “great success story” our current first family wants us to believe in again. Slightly over a century ago, as the US mobilized for the First World War, the nation faced devastating breakdowns of its financial and transport systems. In response, President Woodrow Wilson leaned heavily on his talented and experienced Treasury Secretary, William McAdoo, who just happened to be his son-in-law. Looking back at this episode tells us a lot about what makes for successful emergency management at the highest levels of government.

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Here are 7 ways Donald Trump is just like Henry Ford — and why that’s not good for American democracy

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On May 21, speaking at the Ford Motor Company’s Rawsonville plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan, Donald Trump paid his latest homage to Henry Ford, lauding the family’s “good bloodlines” with Ford’s great grandson sitting in the front row.

Ford, like Trump, was obsessed with bloodlines—with the idea that race and genetic origins determined who counted as the “best people.”

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