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Legendary ‘Atlantis’ metal possibly found in 2,600-year-old shipwreck off Sicily

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Divers exploring an ancient shipwreck discovered ingots of what may be the legendary ancient metal orichalcum, which was said to have been originally forged in the lost kingdom of Atlantis.

According to Discovery News, the diving team was exploring a 2,600-year-old shipwreck off the coast of Sicily when they found the lumps of metal.

The sunken ship was probably bringing its cargo from somewhere in Greece or Asia Minor, say scientists, when it went down just outside the harbor at the port city of Gela, possibly while trying to make landfall during a storm. The ancient wreck is located about 1,000 feet from shore at a depth of about 3.5 meters.

“The wreck dates to the first half of the sixth century [B.C.],” said Sebastiano Tusa, Sicily’s superintendent of the Sea Office, to Discovery.

“Nothing similar has ever been found,” Tusa continued. “We knew orichalcum from ancient texts and a few ornamental objects,” but the 39 ingots found in the ruins of the ship are like nothing seen in the modern world.

Orichalcum has been referred to in ancient texts and was said to line the halls of the Temple of Poseidon on the mythical island kingdom of Atlantis. The spires of Atlantis were said to shine “with the red light of orichalcum” in a fourth century B.C. text by Plato.

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The metal was purportedly invented by Cadmus — an alchemist from Greek and Phoenician myth — and was second in value only to gold in the ancient world.

Today, many scientists agree that orichalcum was a brass-like alloy that, Discovery said, was made by a process known as cementation, which involved “the reaction of zinc ore, charcoal and copper metal in a crucible.”

Engineer Dario Panetta analyzed the ingots from the wreck via X-ray fluorescence and found that they are made up of 75 to 80 percent copper and 15 to 20 percent of zinc with traces of other metals including nickel, lead and iron.

Retired physics professor Enrico Mattievich disagrees that these ingots represent orichalcum, which wasn’t brass-like at all, he says.

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“It appears they are lumps of latone metal, an alloy of copper, zinc and lead,” said Mattievich.

Tusa told Discovery that whether or not the ingots are truly orichalcum, they provide valuable insight into the business and economic life of Gela, which has been a port city for thousands of years.

“It will provide us with precious information on Sicily’s most ancient economic history,” said Tusa.

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Trump was ready to ‘blow up everything’: Biographer Michael Wolff on why Mueller didn’t indict

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It is not an easy task to discern the truth when confronting a president and his allies who have created their own reality, one in which truth and lies have no absolute meaning and are, for them, ultimately interchangeable.

Donald Trump does this on a personal level: he has lied at least 10,000 times while president.

During his recent interview with ABC's George Stephanopoulos, Donald Trump continued to lie in public, asserting that he did not try to fire special sounsel Robert Mueller. As multiple sources and witnesses agree, this is not true. Trump also asserted that he can do anything that he wants, according to the Constitution: He apparently believes he is a king or emperor. This too is a lie. The Constitution grants the president no such powers, and was drafted by the framers to stop demagogues and would-be tyrants such as Donald Trump.

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2020 Election

CNN panel destroys Trump’s mass arrest threat of millions as a wildly unrealistic Orlando rally stunt

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The panel on CNN's New Day cast a jaundiced eye at a threat Donald Trump made on Monday night where he threatened mass arrests of millions of immigrant families as part of an ICE operation.

On Twitter, the president wrote: "Next week ICE will begin the process of removing the millions of illegal aliens who have illicitly found their way into the United States. They will be removed as fast as they come in. Mexico, using their strong immigration laws, is doing a very good job of stopping people."

According to one panelist on CNN, the president's threat was timed as a political stunt, with the contributor Jackie Kucinich calling it "rally-fodder" before his Orlando campaign kickoff.

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Trump’s ‘no collusion’ lie is finally falling apart — but will Americans actually notice?

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Although the Mueller Report has been in the public domain for nearly two months, there’s still a ton of confusion and disinformation around it. The confusion is specifically due to two things: Very few voters have actually read it, and Donald Trump is delighted to exploit that fact. It doesn’t help that Robert Mueller has been more than a little cryptic about his findings — refusing to answer questions or to appear for congressional testimony to clear the air.

Consequently, the president and his Red Hat loyalists continue to repeat the “NO COLLUSION!' lie with very little push-back. The all-caps falsehood gains momentum every time Trump repeats it. Likewise, Bill Barr’s March 24 letter and his subsequent public remarks erroneously confirmed Trump’s lie before anyone, including Congress, was allowed to actually read the report.

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