Quantcast
Connect with us

Arkansas Republican who gave girls to rapist ‘regularly’ performed exorcisms on unruly preschoolers

Published

on

The Arkansas Republican who gave his adopted daughters to a man who raped one of them was apparently in the habit of attempting to cast “demons” out of the children in his federally-funded pre-kindergarten.

According to KNWA news, a former employee of Harris’ Growing God’s Kingdom — who was also a mother of a student in the school — came forward Wednesday to discuss the bizarre pseudo-religious rituals Harris and his wife Marsha would perform on students as a routine part of daily life at the school.

The former teacher — who asked to be identified as “Amber” — said that the Harrises would perform an exorcism ritual when children were acting up.

“If they got in too much trouble they would pray on the kids, do a circle around them, put their hands on their heads, saying, trying to rebuke demons,” she said to KNWA.

Amber worked at the school for about five months in 2013, but was fired when she took exception to the Harrises’ methods for disciplining the children.

She told KNWA’s Lauren Conley that these efforts to drive “demons” out of little children was a fairly common occurrence during her time at the school.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Well, I had another teacher there that had me take a child down to the office and whenever I did, they did it right there in front of me,” she said.

Marsha Harris introduced Amber to the two adopted girls who the family later gave up to Eric and Stacey Francis. Eric Francis is currently serving a 40-year prison sentence for the rape of the older girl, who was six years old when the Harrises “re-homed” her because they believed the girls were possessed and could communicate telepathically.

Amber said that Marsha Harris spoke freely and openly about the demons she believed were possessing the girls.

Nonetheless, the former teacher said she was comfortable leaving her son at Growing God’s Kingdom as a student until this week, but is now withdrawing him and finding another school.

ADVERTISEMENT

“With all this going on, I think it’s too much for him right now. I just don’t feel comfortable with him being there,” she said.

Justin and Marsha Harris gave a contentious, emotional press conference at the Arkansas state capitol last Friday, but now virtually every claim that they made in that conference has come apart under scrutiny as a panoply of Aransas Department of Human Services (DHS) workers, other foster parents and other witnesses have contradicted the Harris family’s account of events.

The family is accused of keeping the older of the two girls locked in a room with no books or toys, monitored by a video camera and kept separate from her sister, who the Harrises believed she could communicate with telepathically.

Harris is accused by state officials of flying in the face of multiple professionals’ opinions about his family’s ability to raise the two girls, who came from a traumatic and chaotic home where they were neglected, molested and abused.

ADVERTISEMENT

One former foster mother familiar with the girls and their deeply troubled older sister said that Harris used his clout as a state legislator to bulldoze past concerns by DHS officials and individuals familiar with the children.

“The problem was simple hubris,” she said. “He saw it as, ‘I’m with God. God’s going to solve this.'”

“There are lots of children you could adopt,” she continued, “you don’t need to take the most traumatized ones out of the system. He was told by many people in DHS, ‘These are not the kids you want to just jump into.’ That’s why I’m angry. I knew [the oldest daughter] wouldn’t last five minutes there.”

Harris and Growing God’s Kingdom ran afoul of the DHS and the federal government in 2011, when Harris came under fire for taking federal funds for the school, which — as a religious institution — was not eligible for them. Harris claimed that the school’s frequent group prayers and lesson about Jesus were “voluntary” for students, who were under no obligation to participate.

ADVERTISEMENT

Growing God’s Kingdom receives around $900,000 per year in federal funds, some of which are derived from monies designated for the children of undocumented immigrants. Earlier this year, Harris sponsored a bill in the state House designed to cut off all public services and benefits to anyone who could not provide proof of U.S. citizenship.

Watch video about this story, embedded below:

Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump’s horsewhip-carrying chief of protocol will resign after intimidating State Department staff: report

Published

on

President Donald Trump's chief of protocol plans to step down just ahead of the G-20 summit in Japan, according to Bloomberg News.

Sean Lawler, whose job includes assisting the president in diplomatic talks overseas and with foreign leaders in the White House, faces an investigation from the State Department's inspector general for intimidating subordinates, including carrying a horsewhip around the office.

The president reportedly did not care for Lawler, at one point asking officials why he still works at the White House.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Jerry Falwell, Jr blasted as ‘un-Christian prat’ after trying to defend Donald Trump in battle with Southern Baptist ethics chief

Published

on

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell, Jr. was ripped online for attempting to rationalize President Donald Trump's detention camps for children.

Dr. Russell Moore, the president of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, posted on Twitter an Associated Press story on the "perilous conditions" at a Texas Border Patrol station holding 300 children.

"The reports of the conditions for migrant children at the border should shock all of our consciences. Those created in the image of God should be treated with dignity and compassion, especially those seeking refuge from violence back home. We can do better than this," Moore wrote.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

How one woman taunting a homeless McDonald’s employee turned his life around

Published

on

A woman in Fayette County, Georgia recently took to Facebook to disparage a McDonald's worker who was sleeping in the restaurant. "I go and tell an employee there is someone is asleep in their booth and her response was 'oh yeah, we know hee hee, it's ok' and I said 'not really but whatever,'" she wrote.

It turned out the sleeping employee, Simon Childs, is a 21-year-old homeless father who had recently lost his mother and was trying to catch some rest between multiple shifts at the restaurant.

Continue Reading
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

 ENOUGH IS ENOUGH 

Trump endorses killing journalists, like Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi. Online ad networks are now targeting sites that cover acts of violence against dissidents, LGBTQ people and people of color.

Learn how you can help.
close-link