Quantcast
Connect with us

Arkansas Republican who gave girls to rapist ‘regularly’ performed exorcisms on unruly preschoolers

Published

on

The Arkansas Republican who gave his adopted daughters to a man who raped one of them was apparently in the habit of attempting to cast “demons” out of the children in his federally-funded pre-kindergarten.

According to KNWA news, a former employee of Harris’ Growing God’s Kingdom — who was also a mother of a student in the school — came forward Wednesday to discuss the bizarre pseudo-religious rituals Harris and his wife Marsha would perform on students as a routine part of daily life at the school.

ADVERTISEMENT

The former teacher — who asked to be identified as “Amber” — said that the Harrises would perform an exorcism ritual when children were acting up.

“If they got in too much trouble they would pray on the kids, do a circle around them, put their hands on their heads, saying, trying to rebuke demons,” she said to KNWA.

Amber worked at the school for about five months in 2013, but was fired when she took exception to the Harrises’ methods for disciplining the children.

She told KNWA’s Lauren Conley that these efforts to drive “demons” out of little children was a fairly common occurrence during her time at the school.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Well, I had another teacher there that had me take a child down to the office and whenever I did, they did it right there in front of me,” she said.

Marsha Harris introduced Amber to the two adopted girls who the family later gave up to Eric and Stacey Francis. Eric Francis is currently serving a 40-year prison sentence for the rape of the older girl, who was six years old when the Harrises “re-homed” her because they believed the girls were possessed and could communicate telepathically.

Amber said that Marsha Harris spoke freely and openly about the demons she believed were possessing the girls.

ADVERTISEMENT

Nonetheless, the former teacher said she was comfortable leaving her son at Growing God’s Kingdom as a student until this week, but is now withdrawing him and finding another school.

“With all this going on, I think it’s too much for him right now. I just don’t feel comfortable with him being there,” she said.

Justin and Marsha Harris gave a contentious, emotional press conference at the Arkansas state capitol last Friday, but now virtually every claim that they made in that conference has come apart under scrutiny as a panoply of Aransas Department of Human Services (DHS) workers, other foster parents and other witnesses have contradicted the Harris family’s account of events.

ADVERTISEMENT

The family is accused of keeping the older of the two girls locked in a room with no books or toys, monitored by a video camera and kept separate from her sister, who the Harrises believed she could communicate with telepathically.

Harris is accused by state officials of flying in the face of multiple professionals’ opinions about his family’s ability to raise the two girls, who came from a traumatic and chaotic home where they were neglected, molested and abused.

One former foster mother familiar with the girls and their deeply troubled older sister said that Harris used his clout as a state legislator to bulldoze past concerns by DHS officials and individuals familiar with the children.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The problem was simple hubris,” she said. “He saw it as, ‘I’m with God. God’s going to solve this.'”

“There are lots of children you could adopt,” she continued, “you don’t need to take the most traumatized ones out of the system. He was told by many people in DHS, ‘These are not the kids you want to just jump into.’ That’s why I’m angry. I knew [the oldest daughter] wouldn’t last five minutes there.”

Harris and Growing God’s Kingdom ran afoul of the DHS and the federal government in 2011, when Harris came under fire for taking federal funds for the school, which — as a religious institution — was not eligible for them. Harris claimed that the school’s frequent group prayers and lesson about Jesus were “voluntary” for students, who were under no obligation to participate.

Growing God’s Kingdom receives around $900,000 per year in federal funds, some of which are derived from monies designated for the children of undocumented immigrants. Earlier this year, Harris sponsored a bill in the state House designed to cut off all public services and benefits to anyone who could not provide proof of U.S. citizenship.

ADVERTISEMENT

Watch video about this story, embedded below:


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘The ground is shifting’: Longtime GOP aide sounds the alarm that Trump is putting Arizona in play

Published

on

Chuck Coughlin, who once served as a top aide to two different Republican governors in Arizona, is warning that President Donald Trump is putting his state in play for the 2020 presidential election.

In an interview with Politico, Coughlin said his party has expressed real anxiety about the state turning blue next year.

"Republicans are very concerned,” he said. "The ground is shifting."

At the moment, just 45 percent of Arizona voters have a favorable view of Trump, while 53 percent have an unfavorable view. Additionally, the victory of Sen. Kyrsten Sinema (D-AZ) in last year's midterm elections showed that Democrats can be competitive in statewide races in a place that became famous for electing iconic conservative senators such as John McCain and Barry Goldwater.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

PolitiFact corrects conservatives: The NYT Kavanaugh story has not been debunked

Published

on

The new report from The New York Times on the allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh contained some stunning new revelations — including that several people tried to contact the FBI to corroborate Deborah Ramirez's assault allegation but were ignored, and that prominent attorney Max Stier alleges he saw Kavanaugh take part in a third assault.

But conservative news sites are now running with the idea that the Times article has been discredited and that the paper has retracted its claims. PJ Media, a prominent right-wing site, ran the headline "New York Times Now Admits New Kavanaugh Accusation Is Fake News."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Longtime GOP strategist explains why his party is getting crushed in the war of ideas

Published

on

Republican strategist Stuart Stevens on Wednesday warned the GOP that Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) might not be a pushover candidate against President Donald Trump in 2020.

Writing on Twitter, Stevens admitted that he had "no idea" if Warren would beat Trump next year, but he did say that "Trump and supporters are destroying [the] credibility of any center-right argument" thanks to Trump's "corrupt and unstable" governance.

When one of Stevens' followers said that Warren would not be able to fulfill her promises just by taxing the wealthy, he countered that this idea is still more popular than anything Republicans are championing.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image