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Cardinal Dolan finally makes sense: Comparing ISIS to Christian terrorists is an ‘accurate’ analogy

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Timothy Dolan speaks to CNN (screen grab)

Cardinal Dolan, one of the most conservative and outspoken Catholic leaders in the U.S., on Tuesday echoed President Barack Obama by drawing a “parallel” between ISIS and Christian terrorists.

At the National Prayer Breakfast earlier this year, the president had reminded Christians not to get on a “high horse” while denouncing Islamic terrorism because their religion had also been perverted to justify slavery and the Crusades.

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“These extremist do not represent genuine Islamic thought,” Dolan told CNN host Chris Cuomo on Tuesday. “Even the majority of temperate, peace-loving Muslims would say, ‘I’m afraid they have a particular strand of erroneous Islam.’ But I do think they are. They are distorting it.”

“You know the parallel I’ve drawn?” he continued. “And enough people have been kind enough to tell me they think the analogy is accurate. Remember 30-35 years ago with the IRA in Ireland? The IRA claimed to be Catholic. And they were baptized, they had a Catholic identity. What they were doing was a perversion of everything the church stood for.”

“The analogy I think is somewhat accurate. These are not pure — these are not real Muslims.”

As the interview ended, Cuomo gave Dolan a chance to weigh in on how the courts repeatedly striking down bans against same-sex marriage in the United States.

“Obviously, we don’t take our cue from what’s happening politically or legally,” Dolan insisted. “We take our cues from divine revelation, from the Bible and from what we believe is planted in the human heart. So, we’re going to continue to do that.”

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“Even with the young Catholics saying they disagree?” Cuomo wondered.

“Oh, yeah,” Dolan replied. “Nor do we take our cues from the opinion polls because know that a good number of — a good chunk of the United States and even a good number of our own people don’t agree with us.”

“But we feel we have got to be courageous in proclaiming the truth about marriage, and we will do that.”

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Dolan insisted that he was not familiar with a report commissioned by Pope Francis that called on the Catholic church to recognize the “positive aspects of civil unions and cohabitation.”

“All of us wonder if there is a type of relationship where certain civil rights could be respected that would not rise to a redefinition of marriage,” Dolan explained. “And that’s what’s, of course, you call the civil partnerships.”

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“I wonder though if we as a church could ever even give a nod to something that we feel and believe with all our heart and soul is not consonant with what God has taught us. That would be a tough thing for us as Catholics to do.”

Watch the video below from CNN’s New Day, broadcast March 3, 2015.

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2020 Election

Trump says militia that sought to kidnap and kill Michigan’s Gov. Whitmer was ‘maybe a problem, maybe it wasn’t’

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In a startling moment during his Michigan rally Tuesday, President Donald Trump implied that the militia that attempted to kidnap and kill Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D-MI) was maybe or maybe not all that big of a problem.

“People are entitled to say maybe it was a problem, maybe it wasn’t," Trump told his rally.

It's a commonly used tactic by Trump to say things like "people say" or "some say" or raise hypotheticals so that it gives him the ability to say "I don't think that, people do." But he has never been able to cite the actual person that said that to him.

In this case, one would assume all political leaders would oppose kidnapping and killing a political leader regardless of the party to which he or she belongs. In Ohio they've opted for a gentler approach, merely trying to recall Republican Gov. Mike DeWine for his mask mandate.

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2020 Election

Trump’s closing argument to women: ‘We’re getting your husbands back to work’

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One week before the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump made his closing argument to women at a campaign rally in Lansing, Michigan.

"I love women and I can't help it, they're the greatest," Trump said, four years after the Access Hollywood tape was released which showed him bragging about sexually assaulting strangers.

"I love them much more than the men," he added.

Trump also made an economic argument that sounded as dated as his talk about "suburban housewives."

"We're getting your husbands -- they want to get back to work, right? We're getting your husbands back to work," he argued.

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2020 Election

Trump chants ‘COVID!’ ten times in a row after Obama slams him as ‘jealous’ of virus

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President Donald Trump on Tuesday again complained about the amount of media coverage being given to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Trump made the remarks at a campaign event in Lansing, Michigan, where he reminded supporters that he had been infected by the virus.

"I would like to give me full credit," the president said of his recovery. "I don't want to give the drug any credit. I want to say, because I am a very young person that's in perfect physical shape, I took that virus and I woke up the next morning and I felt like Superman."

Trump then motioned to members of the media at the event.

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