Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Mutiny on the Bounty’ descendants living on Norfolk Island to lose self-rule

Published

on

A remote Pacific island whose residents are descendants of the swashbuckling British sailors and Tahitian women immortalised in the “Mutiny on the Bounty” movies is set to lose its right to self-rule.

Norfolk Island, 1,500 kilometres (900 miles) east of the Australian coast and settled by the descendants of Fletcher Christian and other Bounty mutineers in 1856, has governed itself since 1979.

ADVERTISEMENT

But it is effectively bankrupt and Canberra on Thursday said it would introduce legislation next week to scrap the Australian territory’s parliament.

If it passes, the island’s legislative assembly will be temporarily replaced by an advisory council, before local government elections in 2016.

Personal and business tax will be introduced from July 2016, and residents will in return be able to access social security and healthcare benefits and services enjoyed by other Australians.

Australia’s assistant regional development minister Jamie Briggs said the changes were long overdue and it was not sustainable to ask a community of just 1,800 to deliver local, state and federal services.

ADVERTISEMENT

He said the infrastructure on Norfolk Island was run down, the health system not up to standard and laws out of date.

“The community overwhelmingly supports reform and is of the view that the current governance arrangements are not suitable,” he said, adding that Norfolk Island was effectively in administration and reliant on Australian bailouts.

“It is diabolical — it is quite concerning that it’s been left for so long,” he said.

ADVERTISEMENT

Norfolk Island Chief Minister Lisle Snell said it was unfair to impose such a decision on the tiny outcrop, just eight kilometres long by five kilometres wide (five miles by three miles) and perched on steep cliffs above crashing surf.

“Norfolk Islanders will lose their identity, they will lose their way of life,” Snell told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Most of the core population are descendants of the mutineers who set Captain William Bligh adrift from British warship the Bounty when they famously fell in love with the South Seas, and its women, in 1789.

ADVERTISEMENT

The mutiny gained such a romantic gloss that chief mutineer Christian has been portrayed by a series of Hollywood heart-throbs over the years, including Errol Flynn, Clark Gable, Marlon Brando and Mel Gibson.

Christian and eight other mutineers first made their home on Pitcairn Island with a group of Tahitian women, but their descendants moved nearly 6,000 kilometres to Norfolk Island in 1856 when Pitcairn became too small for them.

Queen Victoria granted them the right to settle in the abandoned former penal colony.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Ex-Pompeo adviser agrees to testify to impeachment investigators after resigning: report

Published

on

On Monday, Politico's Andrew Desiderio reported that Michael McKinley, a former ambassador to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, has agreed to testify behind closed doors to House Democrats leading the impeachment investigation against President Donald Trump:

NEWS: Former Pompeo adviser Michael McKinley, who resigned last week, will testify in closed session on Wednesday before House impeachment investigators, according to an official working on the inquiry.

— Andrew Desiderio (@AndrewDesiderio) October 14, 2019

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Here’s why Rudy Giuliani can not legitimately claim to be Donald Trump’s lawyer

Published

on

Former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani bills himself as President Donald Trump's attorney. But one former prosecutor explained why that is not an accurate description during a Monday appearance on MSNBC.

"Meet the Press Daily" anchor Katy Tur interviewed former Southern District of New York Assistant U.S. Attorney Mimi Rocah, who is a distinguished fellow in criminal justice at Pace Law School.

"So this news that the SDNY is looking into what Rudy Giuliani was doing overseas in Ukraine, explain what they’re doing. Also, very weird since Giuliani used to run the office," Tur noted.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Rudy Giuliani’s bank records part of investigation by federal prosecutors: report

Published

on

On Monday, the Wall Street Journal reported that President Donald Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani is having his banking records scrutinized as part of the federal criminal investigation into his dealings in the Ukraine.

The report says that prosecutors are also looking into his work for a city mayor in the country.

Giuliani has been a central figure in Trump's apparent scheme to extort the Ukrainian president into helping him dig up dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden, holding military aid appropriated by Congress hostage until the country investigates "corruption."

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image