Quantcast
Connect with us

Fox’s Shep Smith schools ‘The Five’: Start covering Baltimore and stop trying to ‘indict’ it

Published

on

Fox News host Shepard Smith on Oct. 14, 2013.

Fox News host Shepard Smith smacked down attempts by the hosts of The Five to blame activists for the outbreak of violence in Baltimore on Monday, Media Matters reported.

“Where are the parents?” Greg Gutfeld asked over images of looting from the city on Monday evening.

“Well, you know, I’ve not been on the phone with them,” Smith replied. “But if we want to sit here and indict the civil rights community and indict the parents for what we’re watching right now, instead of for now, just covering what happens and then later talk about whose fault it is, because we don’t know whose fault it is.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“No one’s indicting anyone,” Eric Bolling told Smith. “We’re watching the pictures. We’re asking the legitimate questions. A lot of our viewers are probably asking the same questions.”

“Bolling, the question was, ‘Where are the parents?'” Smith shot back. “Surely you don’t expect me to know that.”

“I agree, Shep, it was a hypothetical,” Gutfeld offered, before Bolling asked where civil rights leaders like Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson were, apparently unaware that Jackson was a speaker at the funeral for 25-year-old Freddie Gray earlier in the day.

Gray’s death in police custody earlier this month was the catalyst for a round of demonstrations leading up to Monday’s unrest. But, Smith explained, multiple factors are also coming into play that have been festering for years.

“We’ve got a major American city that has decades of turmoil within this neighborhood,” Smith said, pointing at an image of the rioting and citing Fox reporter Doug McKelway’s accounts of residents saying police had made them feel “powerless and hopeless.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Gray’s arrest and subsequent death, Smith argued, set the stage for “those who would do harm” to take advantage of the unrest.

“It’s what happened between all of that and today that has led to this,” Smith said. “There is no escaping that reality.”

Watch Smith’s remarks, as posted by Media Matters on Monday, below.

ADVERTISEMENT


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump says militia that sought to kidnap and kill Michigan’s Gov. Whitmer was ‘maybe a problem, maybe it wasn’t’

Published

on

In a startling moment during his Michigan rally Tuesday, President Donald Trump implied that the militia that attempted to kidnap and kill Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (D-MI) was maybe or maybe not all that big of a problem.

“People are entitled to say maybe it was a problem, maybe it wasn’t," Trump told his rally.

It's a commonly used tactic by Trump to say things like "people say" or "some say" or raise hypotheticals so that it gives him the ability to say "I don't think that, people do." But he has never been able to cite the actual person that said that to him.

In this case, one would assume all political leaders would oppose kidnapping and killing a political leader regardless of the party to which he or she belongs. In Ohio they've opted for a gentler approach, merely trying to recall Republican Gov. Mike DeWine for his mask mandate.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

Trump’s closing argument to women: ‘We’re getting your husbands back to work’

Published

on

One week before the 2020 presidential election, Donald Trump made his closing argument to women at a campaign rally in Lansing, Michigan.

"I love women and I can't help it, they're the greatest," Trump said, four years after the Access Hollywood tape was released which showed him bragging about sexually assaulting strangers.

"I love them much more than the men," he added.

Trump also made an economic argument that sounded as dated as his talk about "suburban housewives."

"We're getting your husbands -- they want to get back to work, right? We're getting your husbands back to work," he argued.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Trump chants ‘COVID!’ ten times in a row after Obama slams him as ‘jealous’ of virus

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Tuesday again complained about the amount of media coverage being given to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

Trump made the remarks at a campaign event in Lansing, Michigan, where he reminded supporters that he had been infected by the virus.

"I would like to give me full credit," the president said of his recovery. "I don't want to give the drug any credit. I want to say, because I am a very young person that's in perfect physical shape, I took that virus and I woke up the next morning and I felt like Superman."

Trump then motioned to members of the media at the event.

Continue Reading
 
 
Democracy is in peril. Invest in progressive news. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free. LEARN MORE