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Watch Ben Carson’s bizarre rant on science and climate change: ‘Gravity, where did it come from?’

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Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson engaged in another round of climate change denial while also veering off into remarks about evolution and gravity during a Sept. 30 appearance at the University of New Hampshire, the New Republic reported.

“The way the earth rotates on its axis, how far away it is from the sun. These are all very complex things,” Carson said in response to a question from the audience. “Gravity, where did it come from? I mean, there are so many things. So I don’t denigrate the people who say ‘Eh, eh, whatever, somehow it happened.’ I don’t denigrate them. I just don’t have that much faith.”

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As stated in Newton’s law of universal gravitation, any two objects attract one another with a force that is directly proportional to the product of their masses and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

Footage of the encounter begins with the audience member telling the former neurosurgeon, “You don’t believe in climate change or evolution, I believe. And I was just wondering, do you seriously not believe that climate change is happening?”

Carson — who has called research concerning global warming “irrelevant” — accused news outlets of distorting his remarks before launching into his answer.

“Is there climate change? Of course there’s climate change,” Carson said. “Any point in time temperatures are going up or temperatures are going down. When that stops happening, that’s when we’re in big trouble.”

Though the audience can be heard applauding the response, what Carson was actually describing was weather. As astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson explained on Cosmos last year, “We can’t observe climate directly; all we see is the weather.”

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Carson went on to state that there was “no reason” to make climate change a political issue, before sharing his thoughts on evolution.

“I do believe in micro-evolution, or natural selection,” he said. “But I believe that God gave the creatures He made the ability to adapt to their surroundings. Because He’s very smart. He didn’t want to start over every 50 years.”

Watch Carson’s remarks, as posted online, below.

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Congress still has one big tool left to rein in Trump’s corruption: Oversight Committee Democrat

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Senate Republicans may have managed to quash the impeachment trial without calling forth any new witnesses or seriously considering the evidence against President Donald Trump. And the president may feel vindicated and largely invulnerable as a result.

But, Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-IL) told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Monday, that doesn't mean Democrats don't have one last big play to rein in the president's abuses of power. They can use the first and strongest authority delegated to them: the power of the purse.

"What can Democrats really do when it comes to oversight of the president?" asked Cooper. "I mean, now that impeachment is over, does seem like there are fewer and fewer guardrails, if any."

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Trump said he ‘loved’ the fact that America is more divided than ever: ex-GOP congressman

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President Donald Trump bragged about increasing divisions in America during a White House meeting, a former Republican congressman explained on MSNBC on Monday.

Former Rep. David Jolly (R-FL) told host Joy Reid that "Donald Trump has intentionally tried to create the anxiety" that Americans are explaining.

"Garry Kasparov, the Russian freedom activist, has said the point of disinformation isn't to manipulate the truth, it's to exhaust your critical thinking," Jolly explained. "To exhaust your critical thinking, that's what we're experiencing as voters."

"I had a colleague that was in a meeting in the Roosevelt Room and he said he heard Trump say, 'Have you ever seen the nation so divided?' My colleagues and others said, 'No, we haven't.' Trump said, 'I love it that way.' This is the currency that he's peddling as political strategy, but it's not one we have to accept," Jolly explained.

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The depths of Trump’s paranoia: One person who may know him the best explains what’s ahead

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President Donald Trump's biographer, Michael d'Antonio, knows a great deal about his life, his behavior, and his long history of paranoia. A piece in The New York Times Monday summed up the president's state of mind during the impeachment with one word: "paranoid."

Speaking to the long history of paranoia, d'Antonio recalled that in Trump's book The Art of the Comeback, he wrote ten tips for an effective comeback. No. 3, he said, was "be paranoid."

"He thinks that paranoia is an effective strategy when it comes to managing people and when it comes to doing business," said the biographer. "And I think all of the attitudes that we see him bring into the presidency are things that evidence themselves early in his life. So, he's never trusted people very readily and is very quick to identify someone as an enemy. And then try to root out those who aren't loyal enough. So paranoia is something that's always been a trait for the president, and he considers it a useful, even constructive thing."

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