Quantcast
Connect with us

Antibiotic resistance is leading to a ‘global health crisis’: World Health Organization

Published

on

Antibiotic resistance, which can turn common ailments into killers, has reached dangerous levels worldwide, the World Health Organization warned Monday, saying users still know too little about how antibiotics work.

Antibiotic resistance happens when bugs become immune to existing drugs, allowing minor injuries and common infections to become deadly.

Overuse and misuse of the drugs increases this resistance, but WHO also published a survey of 10,000 people worldwide showing a range of dangerous misconceptions about the threat, which are allowing it to prosper.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The rise of antibiotic resistance is a global health crisis, and governments now recognise it as one of the greatest challenges for public health today,” WHO chief Margaret Chan said in a statement, stressing that resistance was “reaching dangerously high levels in all parts of the world.”

“Antibiotic resistance is compromising our ability to treat infectious diseases and undermining many advances in medicine,” she warned.

WHO’s 12-country survey published Monday found that nearly two thirds of all those questioned (64 percent) believe wrongly that antibiotics can be used to treat colds and flu, despite the fact that the drugs have no impact on viruses.

The survey, conducted in Barbados, China, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Russia, Serbia, South Africa, Sudan and Vietnam, also showed that 66 percent believe that there is no risk of antibiotic resistance for people who take their antibiotics as prescribed.

ADVERTISEMENT

And nearly half (44 percent) thought antibiotic resistance was only a problem for people who take the drugs regularly, when in fact, anyone, of any age and anywhere, can get an antibiotic-resistant infection.

Around a third meanwhile believed it was best to stop an antibiotic treatment as soon as they felt better, rather than completing the prescribed course of treatment, the survey showed.

– ‘Urgent’ to improve understanding –

ADVERTISEMENT

“The findings of this survey point to the urgent need to improve understanding around antibiotic resistance,” Keiji Fukuda, the UN chief’s special representative on antimicrobial resistance, said in the statement.

Along with its survey, WHO launched a campaign Monday called “Antibiotics: Handle with care”, aimed at raising awareness about the problem, and correcting such misconceptions.

“This campaign is just one of the ways we are working with governments, health authorities and other partners to reduce antibiotic resistance,” Fukuda said.

ADVERTISEMENT

“One of the biggest health challenges of the 21st century will require global behaviour change by individuals and societies,” he added.

A WHO report in April showed there were “major gaps” in all regions of the world in addressing the problem and reining in overuse and misuse of antibiotics.

The UN health agency has warned that without urgent action, the world could be headed for “a post-antibiotic era” in which common infections and minor injuries that have long been treatable once again become killers.

ADVERTISEMENT

The survey published Monday showed a dire lack of understanding of the problem and widespread dangerous behaviour.

Broken down by country, the survey for instance showed that five percent of Chinese respondents who had taken antibiotics in the past six months had purchased them on the Internet, while the same percentage in Nigeria had bought them from a stall or hawker.

In Russia, only 56 percent of those who had taken antibiotics in the past year had them prescribed by a doctor or nurse.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Internet rains hell on ‘fake Christian’ Karen Pence’s new Twitter account: ‘I can’t wait for the rapture’

Published

on

The Internet reacted with scorn over the weekend after Second Lady Karen Pence announced a new Twitter account aimed at reelecting President Donald Trump.

In her first tweet, Pence posted a video lavishing praise on the president.

"There are probably a lot of things you don't know about me," Pence says in the video. "For example, I enjoy painting, I love to ride my bike and I like nothing better than reading a good book. On my new Twitter account, I will share what I'm up to when I'm not in the office at the White House."

Excited to start a new #Twitter account to help tell the story of all the accomplishments under the leadership of @realDonaldTrump and @mike_pence! Follow along to KEEP AMERICA GREAT! 🇺🇸 pic.twitter.com/RaPwC5ThyR

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

WATCH: Trump admits he talked to Ukraine president about Joe Biden and his son

Published

on

President Donald Trump Sunday morning admitted he brought up Joe Biden and the former Vice President’s son Hunter Biden while speaking with the President of Ukraine.

“The conversation I had was largely congratulatory, with largely corruption, all of the corruption taking place and largely the fact that we don’t want our people like Vice President Biden and his son creating to the corruption,” Trump said, speaking to reporters from the White House lawn.

Watch:

BREAKING: President Trump admits that he talked to the Ukrainian president about former Vice President Biden. #MTP #IfItsSunday@kristenwelker: "From the president's perspective, the only way to put this story to bed is to release the transcript." pic.twitter.com/aaJ6DjMN0E

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘Left wing hack’: Fox News fans lose it after anchor calls Ukraine allegations ‘a problem’ for Trump

Published

on

Fox News viewers lashed out at the network on Sunday after host Arthel Neville grilled New York Congressman Peter King (R) about President Donald Trump's alleged effort to get Ukraine to help him defeat Joe Biden.

Neville twice asked King about Trump's Ukraine scandal, and both times he evaded the question by saying that Congress does not have a right to know the details of Trump's conversations with foreign leaders.

On her third attempt, Neville got to the point by noting Trump's alleged actions are "a problem."

"We don’t know that it’s true, we hope it’s not true," the Fox News host said of the allegations against Trump. "But if there is a possibility that our president used his office to put pressure on a foreign government -- president-elect -- to dig into his possible, potential political opponent, then that’s a problem."

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Investigate and Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image