Quantcast
Connect with us

Over half of blacks in Georgia who are shot by police are unarmed or shot in the back: report

Published

on

An analysis of records in Georgia found that over half of blacks shot by police were either unarmed or were shot in the back.

According to a report compiled by the Atlanta Journal Constitution and Channel 2 Action News, two out of five whites shot by police in Georgia since 2010 were shot in the back or were unarmed. For black Georgians, that number rises to three in five.

The investigation found that police shot blacks at twice the rate of whites when the percentage of the population was taken into account. At the same time, 78 percent of the officers who pulled their triggers were white.

The analysis found that in 19 percent of all black shootings and 16 percent of all white shootings, the suspect was unarmed. Reporters found at least 70 cases since 2010 where suspects suffered bullet wounds to their backside. In 11 cases, the suspect was both unarmed and shot in the back.

“So many of these cases involve somebody being shot in the back. It’s very, very troubling,” police shootings expert Philip Stinson of Bowling Green State University told the AJC. “I can think of some very, very limited circumstances where it would be legally appropriate, but it’s rare circumstances … You can’t just shoot somebody that’s running away from you.”

According to the report, 20 of the officers involved in fatal sootings had been previously disciplined. The state reportedly has no system in place to track police shootings statewide.

ADVERTISEMENT

Georgia Association of Chiefs of Police Executive Director Frank Rotondo insisted that law enforcement officials knew that the situation had to change.

“We already recognize there is a problem,” Rotondo explained. “We are not blind to the idea that there is a problem in our country. And we are not blind to the idea that we have a lot of shootings that occur in Georgia.”

Lawmakers are expected to debate changes to a law next year that currently gives police officers involved in shootings the right to sit in on the entire grand jury and to provide a statement at the end that cannot be questioned by prosecutors.

Read the entire report here.

Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Prosecutors want hearing on revoking Roger Stone’s bail after he posted right-wing propaganda despite gag order

Published

on

Roger Stone may have violated his gag order with Instagram postings and federal prosecutors want a hearing for a judge to consider modifying the conditions of his release from jail pending trial.

"On or about June 18 and 19, 2019, the defendant posted to Instagram and Facebook, commenting about this case and inviting news organizations to cover the issue," prosecutors said in a filing the day after the most recent posting.

Stone is a longtime political advisor to Donald Trump.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Prosecutors debunk right-wing conspiracy theory in new legal smackdown of Roger Stone

Published

on

Federal prosecutors debunked a conspiracy theory pushed by the far-right in a new legal brief filed on Thursday.

Longtine Donald Trump political advisor Roger Stone had argued federal investigators relied upon a report from the cyber research firm Crowdstrike to conclude that Russia had hacked the Democratic National Committee.

That contention, according to federal prosecutors, is "incorrect."

"While the prosecutors did not go into detail, they noted that the investigators gathered evidence of the Russians’ involvement independently, which led to the indictment last year of 12 Russian military officials in connection with the DNC hack," Politico reported.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘Call the mall cops!’ Roy Moore roasted after saying he’ll make ‘more personal contact with people’ in Senate run

Published

on

Roy Moore, the far-right politician who infamously lost an Alabama Senate race in 2017 after allegations emerged about him molesting teenage girls, announced on Thursday that he was going to once again run for office in 2020.

While touting his potential rematch with Sen. Doug Jones (D-AL), Moore was asked by a reporter what he will do differently this time around.

"I would like to make more personal contact with people," Moore responded.

Given that Moore's history of "personal contact" with underage women was what cost him the 2017 Senate race -- and even allegedly got him banned from a shopping mall that grew weary of his regular efforts to pick up teen girls -- Moore was quickly buried in ridicule on Twitter.

Continue Reading
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

I need your help.

Investigating Trump's henchmen is a full time job, and I'm trying to bring in new team members to do more exclusive reports. We have more stories coming you'll love. Join me and help restore the power of hard-hitting progressive journalism.

TAKE A LOOK
close-link

Investigating Trump is a full-time job, and I want to add new team members to do more exclusive reports. We have stories coming you'll love. Join me and go ad-free, while restoring the power of hard-hitting progressive journalism.

TAKE A LOOK
close-link