Quantcast
Connect with us

Epic blunder gets Trump’s national political director fired after 6 weeks on the job

Published

on

U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has fired his national political director after six weeks on the job, campaign sources said on Wednesday.

Trump told staffers and supporters gathered backstage before a campaign rally in California on Wednesday that political director Rick Wiley “should be fired” for his handling of a fundraising deal with the Republican National Committee, according to the sources.

The RNC fundraising agreement included 11 states but not Nevada, where Republicans in the state are angling for key victories in the November elections. Three sources confirmed Trump said Wiley should be fired after Nevada Republican Party Chairman Michael McDonald told Trump that Wiley was responsible for leaving Nevada out of the deal.

McDonald did not return calls seeking comment. Wiley did not respond to emails, text messages and phone calls seeking comment.

The move is the latest in a tug of war between Trump’s original campaign team, including press secretary Hope Hicks and campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, and a group of professionals he brought in later to shore up support from more traditional corners of the Republican Party.

ADVERTISEMENT

The new arrivals, led by veteran strategist Paul Manafort, whom Trump hired in late March, have urged Trump to tone down some of his most provocative positions, such as his proposed ban on Muslims entering the United States.

But Trump reprimanded Manafort, according to two sources familiar with the conversation, after Manafort told a gathering of RNC members at an April meeting in Florida that Trump was only “acting” when describing his proposed Muslim ban or his plan to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

Manafort hired Wiley on April 13.

ADVERTISEMENT

A statement issued by the Trump campaign said Wiley had been hired on a “short-term basis as a consultant until the campaign was running full steam” and it thanked him for “for helping us during this transition period.”

Manafort did not responds to calls and emails seeking comment.

(Reporting by Emily Flitter in New York; Writing by Eric Beech; Editing by Peter Cooney)


Report typos and corrections to [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

The media’s ‘Made in America’ problem: Trump creates racist controversy — and gets free campaign coverage

Published

on

Let’s presume, however depressing that notion may be, that mainstream news organizations will continue to fumble the ball when it comes to directly calling blatantly racist statements coming out of Donald Trump’s mouth what they are, which is racist.

Let’s also presume that in the fallout of such incidents like Trump’s racist tweets on Sunday, media organizations adopt predictable stances. Most struggle to maintain a sense of equanimity and fairness when it comes to calling out Trump’s racism. Fox amplifies it.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Gay man’s family cut off his ear after he came out

Published

on

A teen man came out to his parents and in response his dad severely mutilated him, reports Gay Star News.

The 19-year-old was then locked in a closet, where he tried not to bleed to death.

The teen is from The Gambia and is trying to get asylum in The Netherlands.

“I was so afraid to tell my family about my sexuality,” he said.

“I thought, maybe, my family will accept me because I am their family. This is who I am.”

“That was the biggest mistake I ever made.”

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Longtime Trump loyalist warns the president that his racist tweets are about to permanently stain his image

Published

on

On Tuesday, former Trump administration official Anthony Scaramucci criticized President Trump for telling four freshman congresswomen to go back to their own countries. All four are American citizens.

Scaramucci accused the president of playing to his base, in a way that has dangerous manifestations: for the president and the country.

“He’s blowing very hard on a dog-whistle that every ethnic group that’s landed in the United States has had to hear,” Scaramucci told the BBC.

“I don’t think the president is a racist, but here’s the thing: if you continue to say and act in that manner, then we all have to look at him and say, ‘OK, well, maybe you weren’t a racist, but now you’re turning into one.'”

Continue Reading
 
 
 

Copyright © 2019 Raw Story Media, Inc. PO Box 21050, Washington, D.C. 20009 | Masthead | Privacy Policy | For corrections or concerns, please email [email protected]

close-image