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Obama downplays Democratic primary tension in ‘Tonight Show’ interview: ‘You get a little ouchy’

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President Barack Obama said on Wednesday he hoped that divisions between Democrats would start to heal in coming weeks, now that his former secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, has clinched the party’s nomination for the Nov. 8 presidential election.

“My hope is that over the next couple of weeks we’re able to pull things together,” Obama said in his first public remarks since primary election wins on Tuesday in California and elsewhere propelled Clinton to victory over rival Bernie Sanders after a hard-fought, months-long campaign.

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“What happens during primaries is you get a little ouchy,” Obama told NBC late-night host Jimmy Fallon during a taping of “The Tonight Show” set to air on Thursday.

Sanders, who has not conceded the race, is set to meet with

Obama at the White House on Thursday at 11:15 a.m.

Asked whether Obama thought Sanders, a U.S. senator from Vermont, should quickly end his campaign, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said the senator had “more than earned the right to make his own decision about the course of his campaign and the president is certainly respectful of that.”

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The party will officially vote on Clinton’s nomination at its convention in Philadelphia at the end of July.

Obama told Fallon that “it was a healthy thing for the Democratic Party to have a contested primary” and praised Sanders for the “enormous energy and new ideas” in his campaign.

“He pushed the party and challenged them. I thought it made Hillary a better candidate,” Obama said.

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The White House has said Obama, who is very popular among Democrats, will play a unifying role on the campaign trail.

“The main role I’m going to be playing in this process is to remind the American people that this is a serious job. This is not reality TV,” Obama told Fallon in a swipe at presumptive Republican nominee and real estate magnate Donald Trump, who starred in a reality television show.

(Reporting by Roberta Rampton; Editing by Leslie Adler and Peter Cooney)

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Giuliani’s public invitation to Ukraine to interfere in US elections opened the door for other countries to run to Trump

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President Donald Trump's attorney Rudy Giuliani turned heads with his bizarre, unhinged rant on national television that effectively urged Ukraine to continue trying to gather dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden — and for news outlets to take whatever they find seriously.

As Casey Michel wrote in The Daily Beast, even if this effort ultimately fails to turn up useful opposition research against Biden, this is a profoundly dangerous development for American democracy.

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Trump whistleblower needs to go directly to FBI because Bill Barr can’t be trusted: Ex-FBI director

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Trump took out DNI head Dan Coats to install a new acting director in charge of whistleblowers: CIA veteran

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Appearing on MSNBC's "AM Joy," a longtime veteran CIA official said the whistleblower, who ran to the inspector general with a complaint about Donald Trump asking Ukraine's president for dirt on Joe Biden, should expect the president and his aides to come after them.

Speaking with host Joy Reid, Jonna Mendez said she saw the first warnings signs that something was up in the U.S. intelligence community when the president forced DNI head Dan Coats and his top deputy out.

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