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Texans can use affidavits or postcards to vote after court strikes down ID law

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Some Texas voters may need to show a state postcard listing them on the election roll to cast ballots in November elections after a U.S. appeals court found the state’s voter ID was discriminatory, specialists said on Thursday.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit on Wednesday ordered a remedy ahead of the November general election to the law, which requires voters to present a photo identification such as a Texas driver’s license, passport or military ID card.

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Challengers said the Texas law discriminated against poor people and minorities such as Latinos and African-Americans, up to 600,000 of whom would be unable to vote if the law was fully in effect.

Allowing a voter registration certificate as an acceptable identification is in the realm of possible remedies, Deuel Ross, an attorney for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund who helped litigate the case, said on Thursday.

He said there may also be a reasonable impediment exemption where some voters sign an affidavit saying they have had trouble obtaining a mandated ID.

“We think all of those are on the table right now as things that judges are very seriously considering,” he said.

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A U.S. district judge this month put in place similar requirements in Wisconsin, which had a voter ID law along the lines of the one in Texas.

The addition of these voters in a state with 27 million people will likely have little effect on the presidential race, where Republican nominee Donald Trump is expected to win in the longtime Republican stronghold, said Mark Jones, a professor in political science at Rice University in Texas.

But the court’s decision could affect four or five local races, he added.

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The Texas governor and secretary of state, named as defendants in the case, did not respond to requests for comment.

Critics of the law said it and similar Republican-backed statutes were intended to make it harder for minorities, who tend to support Democrats, to vote. Backers of these laws have said they are necessary to prevent voter fraud.

The Texas measure was signed into law in 2011, and subject to lawsuits after that.

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The Fifth Circuit said there was little time to implement a remedy and sought a fix from a U.S. district court, which has ruled the current ID law discriminates against minorities who can have trouble obtaining the mandated IDs.

(Reporting by Jon Herskovitz; Editing by David Gregorio)


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‘A profound emoluments clause violation’: Andrew Napolitano slams Trump’s hosting the G7 at Doral

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In the wake of acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney's announcement this Thursday that next year's G7 summit will be hosted at President Trump's Doral golf club, Fox News senior judicial analyst Andrew Napolitano pointed out that Trump would be violating the emoluments clause if he were to go through with the move.

At the outset of the segment, Fox Business Network anchor Neil Cavuto said that the announcement is "effectively saying the president has given himself this contract."

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Elections 2016

Modi tells Xi summit will launch ‘new era’ for India and China

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India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi said Saturday that his summit with Chinese leader Xi Xinping would launch a "new era" between the neighbours who are seeking to overcome troublesome differences.

Modi and Xi strolled along a pristine Bay of Bengal beach and held one-on-one talks overlooking the ocean before their delegations sat down to official negotiations at the historic resort town of Mahbalipuram, south of Chennai.

The two leaders are meeting for the second time in a year in a bid to ease tensions over border disputes, the troubled Kashmir region and China's domination of trade between their huge economies.

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Trump calls for impeachment of Mitt Romney for criticizing him in rambling tweet

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Hours after Donald Trump attacked Sen. Mitt Romney for being critical of his call for the Chinese to dig up dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden, the president was back for another round, calling for the Utah Republiocan to be impeached.

Claiming without evidence that voters in Utah are turning on their senator, Trump claimed, "I’m hearing that the Great People of Utah are considering their vote for their Pompous Senator, Mitt Romney, to be a big mistake. I agree! He is a fool who is playing right into the hands of the Do Nothing Democrats!" followed by:  #IMPEACHMITTROMNEY

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