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Black panel crushes Trump fan claiming Trump is on the ‘cutting edge of civil rights’

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Angela Rye and Kayleigh McEnany (Photo: Screen capture)

Trump supporter Kayleigh McEnany told African American panelists Bakari Sellers and Angela Rye that the GOP nominee Donald Trump is on the “cutting edge of civil rights” after Trump alleged Democrats were bad for black Americans in a Michigan speech Friday.

Bakari Sellers started in with the powerful assersion that African-Americans are only one generation from racist policies that plagued the United States. “We are only one generation away from Jim Crow, segregation and oppression and degradation first deep south and the George Wallaces and the water hoses and the dogs and the little girls in Birmingham and Jimmy Lee Jackson and the list goes on and on and on,” Sellers said.

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He continued that our culture is not that far away from the monumental year 1968. “We had the massacre and Robert Kennedy and Martin Luther King Jr., died in that same year, and all of those things happened and he’s having a hard time understanding how far we’ve come and that way he cannot put together where do we go from here?”

He cited an article in CNN Money about the rate at which black family are growing. “It takes us 228 years to catch up to white families. 228 years! So, to Kayleigh’s argument and Andre’s argument and whoever wants to lay the argument to the back-breaking policies, that ain’t it.”

Attempting to justify claims that Trump will be better for African-Americans than Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton, McEnany attempted to put words in their mouths. “You might think a 27.2% poverty rate among African American individuals … is a good thing but –”

“Kayleigh, when did you hear us say that?” a furious Angela Rye interrupted. “That’s not fair. Kayleigh, can you retract that? Kayleigh? That’s not fair.”

McEnany kept speaking over Rye, ignoring any attempt to disagree or interject as Rye kept calling out her name to stop. McEnany claimed that Trump was performing much better among voters of color than polls indicate, partly due to the fact that he is “on the cutting edge of civil rights” because Trump allowed black and Jewish people into Mar-a-Lago, his club in Florida.

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Both Rye and Sellers insisted that Trump was cited for housing discrimination at properties in New York where employees marked applications from minorities with “C” for “colored.” Trump’s defense was that he didn’t want to rent to Welfare recipients but maintained he wasn’t discriminating.

“There are two things that I need to address,” Rye launched in against McEnany. “One, Kayleigh, I really want you to retract that the poverty rate was a good thing,” She began.

“Bakari sat here last night and tonight,” McEnany attempted to interject.

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“So you’re not going to retract it?” Rye said. “That’s fine. You’re not going to retract it. That’s fine. I did not say that. So, viewers, I did not say that.”

Rye insisted that if Trump wanted to say something meaningful to black Americans he can apologize for all of the hurtful and harmful statements and actions in the past.

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“He can apologize for the howling discrimination for the Department of Justice and he can retract that and apologize for that and he can tell me he never meant to say he’d pay for the legal fees of the guy that punched the black man in the face at the rally,” Rye continued. “And he can apologize for the Indian man thrown out today. He can apologize for the full-page ad. I am just getting started,” She said continuing. “I haven’t even got to last July. Donald Trump doesn’t just have a messaging problem and he has a message and belief problem and he has to hear it from more than rhinestones and polyester and his two — that go out on the trail today.”

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Rod Rosenstein secretly crippled the Mueller investigation: report

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Elections 2016

California bill to establish nation’s second public bank applauded as ‘historic challenge to Wall Street domination’

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"If California is serious about addressing racial and income inequities, we must create a banking system that centers people not profits."

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