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Here are 10 major differences between the Democratic and Republican Party conventions

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Think you’ve been watching America’s political conventions closely? Between the DNC this week in Philadelphia, Penn., and the RNC last week in Cleveland, Ohio, here are 10 major differences.

1. Guns: Ohio is an open carry state and guns were permitted within the “event zone” of the RNC. However, far fewer firearms were seen on the streets of Philadelphia due to a 2013 ban on guns from recreation centers.

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2. Celebrities: The RNC had Scott Baio. The DNC had Meryl Streep. No contest.

3. Diversity: According to Hillary Clinton’s campaign, black men and women accounted for 1,182 delegates out of 4,765, about 25%, compared to 18 out of 2,472 at the RNC, less than 1%.

4. The Business Party: The RNC featured two CEOs (Tom Barrack and Willie Robertson), a lobbyist (Chris Cox) and a venture capitalist (Peter Thiel). On the other hand, the DNC emphasized unions. SEIU president Mary Kay Henry, AFSCME president Lee Saunders and AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka all spoke at the Democrats’ convention.

5. Law and Order: Donald Trump has branded himself as the “law and order” candidate. Yet, only one speaker at the RNC works in law enforcement: David Clarke, Milwaukee County sheriff. By comparison, Pittsburgh Chief of Police Cameron McLay, former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey and Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez all spoke for the Democrats.

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6. Education: The American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten, Arkansas fifth-grade teacher Dustin Parsons and social studies teacher Dave Willis all spoke on education at the DNC. By contrast, Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr. was the only person in the education sector to represent the Republicans.

7. The U.S. Military: Half the people who spoke on behalf of the military at the RNC were Benghazi attack survivors. On the other hand, the DNC featured those who lost loved ones in Iraq and Afghanistan.

8. Delegates: The DNC’s “Never Hillary” crowd outnumbered the RNC’s “Never Trump” crowd, which became apparent during their massive walkout Tuesday.

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9. Quality of Life: The tone of the RNC was far more negative than that of the DNC. Trump’s surrogates called on voters to “Make America great again” while Hillary’s insisted “America is already great.”

10. Most Used Words: In his RNC speech, Donald Trump’s most used word was “country.” Hillary Clinton’s? “People.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
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Millions around the world joined #ClimateStrike — demanding bold climate action

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Masses of children skipped school Friday to join a global strike against climate change that teen activist Greta Thunberg said was "only the beginning" in the fight against environmental disaster.

Some four million people filled city streets around the world, organizers said, in what was billed as the biggest ever protest against the threat posed to the planet by rising temperatures.

Youngsters and adults alike chanted slogans and waved placards in demonstrations that started in Asia and the Pacific, spread across Africa, Europe and Latin America, before culminating in the United States where Thunberg rallied.

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Trump announces new sanctions on Iran — and deploys US troops to the Middle East

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The United States announced Friday that it was sending military reinforcements to the Gulf region following attacks on Saudi oil facilities that it attributes to Iran, just hours after President Donald Trump ordered new sanctions on Tehran.

Trump said the sanctions were the toughest-ever against another country, but indicated he did not plan a military strike, calling restraint a sign of strength.

The Treasury Department renewed action against Iran's central bank after US officials said Tehran carried out weekend attacks on rival Saudi Arabia's oil infrastructure, which triggered a spike in global crude prices.

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‘Do a lot of stupid sh*t as quickly as possible’: Ambassador Power breaks down ’The Trump Doctrine’

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The former ambassador to the United Nations explained "The Trump Doctrine" during a Friday evening interview with comedian Bill Maher on HBO's "Real Time."

Samantha Power, the author of the new book, The Education of an Idealist, was asked by Maher about the foreign policy mantra of the Obama administration.

"Obama's foreign policy doctrine was famously summarized as 'don't do stupid sh*t," Maher noted. "Trump's, of course, is 'Do stupid sh*t.'"

"Do stupid sh*t as quickly as possible," Power clarified.

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