Quantcast
Connect with us

Here are 10 major differences between the Democratic and Republican Party conventions

Published

on

Think you’ve been watching America’s political conventions closely? Between the DNC this week in Philadelphia, Penn., and the RNC last week in Cleveland, Ohio, here are 10 major differences.

1. Guns: Ohio is an open carry state and guns were permitted within the “event zone” of the RNC. However, far fewer firearms were seen on the streets of Philadelphia due to a 2013 ban on guns from recreation centers.

ADVERTISEMENT

2. Celebrities: The RNC had Scott Baio. The DNC had Meryl Streep. No contest.

3. Diversity: According to Hillary Clinton’s campaign, black men and women accounted for 1,182 delegates out of 4,765, about 25%, compared to 18 out of 2,472 at the RNC, less than 1%.

4. The Business Party: The RNC featured two CEOs (Tom Barrack and Willie Robertson), a lobbyist (Chris Cox) and a venture capitalist (Peter Thiel). On the other hand, the DNC emphasized unions. SEIU president Mary Kay Henry, AFSCME president Lee Saunders and AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka all spoke at the Democrats’ convention.

5. Law and Order: Donald Trump has branded himself as the “law and order” candidate. Yet, only one speaker at the RNC works in law enforcement: David Clarke, Milwaukee County sheriff. By comparison, Pittsburgh Chief of Police Cameron McLay, former Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey and Dallas County Sheriff Lupe Valdez all spoke for the Democrats.

6. Education: The American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten, Arkansas fifth-grade teacher Dustin Parsons and social studies teacher Dave Willis all spoke on education at the DNC. By contrast, Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr. was the only person in the education sector to represent the Republicans.

ADVERTISEMENT

7. The U.S. Military: Half the people who spoke on behalf of the military at the RNC were Benghazi attack survivors. On the other hand, the DNC featured those who lost loved ones in Iraq and Afghanistan.

8. Delegates: The DNC’s “Never Hillary” crowd outnumbered the RNC’s “Never Trump” crowd, which became apparent during their massive walkout Tuesday.

9. Quality of Life: The tone of the RNC was far more negative than that of the DNC. Trump’s surrogates called on voters to “Make America great again” while Hillary’s insisted “America is already great.”

ADVERTISEMENT

10. Most Used Words: In his RNC speech, Donald Trump’s most used word was “country.” Hillary Clinton’s? “People.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Texas GOPer Cornyn blames Trump’s problems on campaign ‘grifters’ — then calls Giuliani ‘not relevant’

Published

on

Appearing on CBS's “Face the Nation," Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) attempted to blame Donald Trump's impeachment problems on "grifters" who found a way to attach themselves to the now-president when he began to run for president.

Speaking with host Margaret Brennan, Cornyn was asked about allegations made by Rudy Giuliani associate Lev Parnas that have implicated not only the president but Vice President Mike Pence and senior White House officials in an attempt to strongarm the leaders of Ukraine in return for military aid.

"Doesn't it trouble you that [Parnas] was working so closely with Rudy Giuliani, who was acting on the president's behalf and saying he was acting on the president's behalf?" host Brennan asked. "

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

‘No sound basis’: Georgetown law professor explains why Alan Dershowitz will crumble under Senate questioning

Published

on

Georgetown law professor John Mikhail suggested on Sunday that the portion of President Donald Trump's defense which is being covered by Alan Dershowitz to fail because it has "no sound basis" in history and law.

"There is no sound basis for Alan Dershowitz to claim that abuse of power is not an impeachable offense. In addition to being at odds with common sense, this claim is contradicted by a clear and consistent body of historical evidence," Mikhail stated.

The law professor cited the impeachment of Warren Hastings in the 1780s.

"Some of the best evidence comes from the case of Warren Hastings, which informed the drafting Art. II, Sec 4," Mikhail wrote. "The fact that he was not guilty of treason, but still deserved to be impeached, was a major reason 'other high crimes and misdemeanors' was added to the Constitution."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Ex-White House aide describes Trump’s abusive tantrums when he doesn’t get his way: ‘Not normal at all’

Published

on

Appearing on MSNBC on Sunday afternoon, former Donald Trump advisor Omarosa Manigault Newman backed up assertions in the book " A Very Stable Genius" that the president is prone to tantrums when he doesn't get his way and becomes abusive to staffers and cabinet members alike.

Speaking with host Alex Witt, Omarosa -- who wrote an insider's account of life in the White House after she was unceremoniously fired -- said there was little in the new book that surprised her.

Digging into her Oval Office days, the former adviser and longtime Trump associate described the president's "zero to 200" screaming jags when displeased.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image