Quantcast
Connect with us

Which are stronger: beer goggles or weed goggles? Scientists now have some answers

Published

on

In a recent study published in the Archives of Sexual Behavior, researchers compared the effects that alcohol and marijuana have on sexual encounters, as self-reported by study participants. Some of the “findings” are head-smackingly obvious, gussied up in fancy words.

This article was originally published by The Influence, a news site that covers the full spectrum of human relationships with drugs. Follow The Influence on Facebook or Twitter.

ADVERTISEMENT

For example, can you believe that “alcohol was commonly associated with social outgoingness,” or that its “use facilitated connections with potential sexual partners”?

Some of the results, though, are interesting—like the finding that drunk sex is more likely than high sex to be associated with post-coital regret.

The researchers, affiliated with NYU’s Center for Drug Use and HIV Research (CDUHR), say that both male and female participants often reported positive sexual effects of the two substances. However, in addition to post-sex regret, there were other negative effects reported too. Marijuana use was linked to vaginal dryness among women, while alcohol use was linked to impotence in men.

Part of the reason alcohol may lead to more regrets than marijuana, researchers speculated, is that subjects—both male and female—were more likely to experience “beer goggles” than “weed goggles.” They felt that their standards for choosing a sexual partner were lowered under the influence of alcohol. In contrast, participants who had smoked marijuana tended to report increased feelings of anxiety or wariness in unfamiliar situations.

“It wasn’t surprising that alcohol use reportedly led to less post-sex satisfaction than marijuana,” said Joseph J. Palamar, PhD, MPH, the lead author. “Sexual encounters on marijuana tended to be with someone the individual knew. Sex on alcohol was often with a stranger.”

ADVERTISEMENT

That seems to be assuming that sex with someone you know is more satisfying than sex with a stranger, which not everyone may agree with. And even though alcohol was more likely than weed to be associated with social outgoingness, marijuana’s continuing illicit status in many places actually facilitated sex in some cases.

“Since smoking marijuana recreationally is illegal in most states and smoking it tends to produce a strong odor,” noted Dr. Palamar, “it usually has to be used in a private setting. Some individuals utilize such private or intimate situations to facilitate sexual encounters.”

It’s important to note the extremely small sample size of this qualitative study—24 adults (12 male and 12 female, all heterosexual and HIV-negative) who reported recent use of marijuana before sex.

ADVERTISEMENT

But it opens up interesting questions—for example in relation to another new study (splashed across news headlines this week) indicating that young people have less sex than previous generations did at their age. Could there be a link between decreased stigma around marijuana and a decrease in young people’s sexual activity?

Regardless, as marijuana becomes legal, it will be important to examine the way it affects sexual activity and risk.

ADVERTISEMENT

“Research is needed continue to study sexual effects of recreational drugs to inform prevention to ensure that users and potential users of these drugs are aware of sexual effects associated with use,” said Dr. Palamar. “Our results can inform prevention and harm reduction education especially with regard to marijuana, since people who smoke marijuana generally don’t receive any harm reduction information at all. They’re pretty much just told not to use it.”

This article was originally published by The Influence, a news site that covers the full spectrum of human relationships with drugs. Follow The Influence on Facebook or Twitter.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

The truth about Bernie Sanders’ medical records: They’re encouraging — but a key detail is missing

Published

on

When Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) landed in the hospital at the beginning of October 2019 after suffering a heart attack, it became guaranteed that his health would be an issue in the 2020 Democratic primary. The 78-year-old is known for his passionate rallies and reveling in the rigors of the campaign, but a candidate's health condition can change the course of an election, and a serious medical crisis like a heart attack puts into question his ability to do the job.

To help allay these concerns, Sanders assured voters that he would release "comprehensive" medical records. But he hasn't, and now it seems he doesn't plan on doing it. Instead, he released three letters in December from doctors describing his health positively and vouching for his ability to handle the campaign trail and potentially, the presidency.

Continue Reading

2020 Election

How the question of who killed JFK emerged in an unexpected way on the 2020 campaign trail

Published

on

On Monday night in Fairfax, Virginia, Donald Jeffries, author and talk radio host, asked Democratic presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard about a book she was seen carrying, “JFK and the Unspeakable.” Published in 2008, the book is a Catholic philosopher’s meditation about the assassination of liberal president John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, one of the great historical crimes of American politics.

Gabbard replied she had not finished the book, but “from what I have read, it… speaks to what happened [on November 22] in a way that I haven’t seen anywhere else.”

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump whines about losing the Time ‘Man of the Year’ award he lost to a teenage girl

Published

on

President Donald Trump goaded his audience into booing a teenager during a campaign rally in Colorado Springs on Thursday.

Trump said, "I got beaten up by Greta" -- in reference to Swedish climate change activist Greta Thunberg, who recently celebrated her 17th birthday.

The leader of the free world went on to complain about Thunberg being declared TIME magazine's "Person of the Year" award in 2019.

He said that many women wish it was still "Man of the Year" and suggested separate categories by gender, which would prevent him from competing against European teenage girls.

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image