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Trump campaign tricked workers and store owners into appearing in ad — and now they’re furious

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The makers of a Donald Trump campaign ad are being accused of using people’s likenesses under false pretenses, WCAU-TV reported.

“That’s what Trump do,” said Calvin Anderson, a Philadelphia man seen in Trump’s “Two Americas” ad. “I mean, that’s what he do. It’s all part of the slandering part but I don’t know why he chose me.”

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Anderson, a construction worker who is actually planing to vote for Democrat Hillary Clinton in November, said he was approached by a photographer outside his work site in July.

“We thought it had something to do with the building,” he recalled. “Before you know it he said, ‘Sign these waivers.’ I’m like, ‘Waivers for what?’ And it had nothing on there about Trump.”

Anderson’s union, the Operative Plasterers’ and Cement Masons’ International Association, sent a letter to its members alerting them about Anderson’s unwitting involvement in the ad, and calling on Trump’s campaign to stop airing it.

“[Anderson] and others were intentionally misled and not told that his photo or image would be used for the specific purpose of a Donald Trump campaign advertisement,” union general president Daniel Stepano said in the letter.

Likewise, Grethe Kiley said she was unaware that the film crew that set up outside John’s Friendly Market — her family’s business in nearby Haddon Heights, New Jersey — would be showing the store as part of the ad, with an unidentified model playing the part of a small business owner.

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Since the ad debuted in Pennsylvania, Kiley said, longtime customers have threatened to stop shopping at John’s out of anger that it would be associated with the Republican presidential nominee.

“My concern is, our image is being connected with a particular candidate,” Kiley told Philly.com. “It just feels invasive and intrusive. Plus the fact that we were misled.”

A Trump spokesperson, Greg Manz, said that he was not aware of the union’s demand, and also rejected Kiley’s complaint, saying, “The production company hired to film the stock images received permission from the store manager to film at the location.”

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WCAU’s report, as aired on Thursday, can be seen below.

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Trump aide told investigators Paul Manafort began spreading Ukraine conspiracy theories as soon as DNC server hack was revealed

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On Friday, a new batch of documents recording the interviews former special counsel Robert Mueller's prosecutors held with aides to President Donald Trump was released, as part of a Freedom of Information Act request by BuzzFeed News.

One of the revelations in the interviews with Rick Gates, who served as an aide to former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, was that Manafort began pushing conspiracy theories about Ukraine at the same time that the Russian hack into the Democratic National Committee became publicly known.

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Joe Biden takes on Trump’s rhetoric during racial justice crises: ‘The words of a president matter’

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Former Vice President Joe Biden talked about the importance of a president's words and accountability during times of crisis during a Friday appearance on MSNBC.

Biden was interviewed by Craig Melvin, who noted the protests tearing apart cities and asked where he would start if elected president.

"I start by talking about what we must be, making no excuses, talking about our obligation to be decent," Biden answered. "Our obligation to take responsibility, our obligation to stand up when we see injustice."

"Look, the words of a president matter -- no matter how good or bad that president is," he explained. "A president can, by their words alone no matter who they are, make it rise or fall, take us to war, bring us to peace. The words of a president matter."

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South Carolina Republicans gather for an ‘active rejection’ of social distancing measures: report

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On Friday, The New York Times reported on a gathering of Republicans in Conway, South Carolina that appeared to be an "active rejection" of social distancing measures and other public health guidelines.

"The outdoor gathering here on Thursday was a send-off event for Cleo Steele, a longtime Republican Party operative in Horry County, who is retiring to Ohio," wrote Astead Herndon. "Speakers shared the same microphone. Local and state political candidates greeted voters with handshakes and squeezed tight for pictures. Of all the people gathered outside the county Republican office — many of them senior citizens — fewer than a dozen wore masks."

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