Quantcast
Connect with us

Trump’s ‘law and order’ rhetoric just got annihilated by a member of the Central Park 5

Published

on

Nearly thirty years have passed since a group of teenagers were wrongfully imprisoned for brutally attacking and raping a 28-year-old woman in Central Park.

The group of boys, now known as the Central Park 5, were interrogated by police after being deprived of “food, drink or sleep for more than 24 hours,” Yusef Salaam writes in an article for the Washington Post.

ADVERTISEMENT

Salaam recounts how, back in 1989, he and three of the boys — all black and Latino — falsely confessed to the crime under duress. “Though we were innocent,” he writes, “we spent our formative years in prison, branded as rapists.”

At the time, Donald Trump spent $85,000 on a full-page ad in four newspapers across the city of New York, which read “Bring Back The Death Penalty. Bring Back Our Police!”

The Central Park 5 were exonerated in 2002 — after spending 13 years in prison — when Matias Reyes confessed to raping the woman and DNA evidence proved the same.

Donald Trump, who is now the presidential nominee of a major political party stands by his initial statement on the Central Park 5.

ADVERTISEMENT

In a statement he made to CNN last week, the GOP nominee said, “They admitted they were guilty. The police doing the original investigation say they were guilty. The fact that that case was settled with so much evidence against them is outrageous. And the woman, so badly injured, will never be the same.”

Salaam writes, the fact that Trump stands by his dangerous claims even now is “further proof of his bias, racism and inability to admit that he’s wrong.”

He explains:

In some ways, I feel like I’m on trial all over again. Like Trayvon Martin and Mike Brown, young men who were killed and then crucified in the media, I know what it is to be a young black man without a voice. Even though we were found innocent by a court of law, we are still guilty in the court of public opinion. That brings a certain kind of stress.

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump has run a violently racist campaign over the last 16 months. He has targeted black Americans, Mexicans, undocumented immigrants, and Muslims, while calling for “law and order,” and an increase in policing.

He has proudly suggested that racialized policing tactics like broken windows and stop and frisk policies be reinstated in the inner cities of Chicago and New York, in order to “Make America Safe Again.” But make America safe for whom?

ADVERTISEMENT

“Black people across America know that because of the color of our skin, we are guilty before proven innocent,” Salaam writes. “As a result, sometimes we lose the best years of our lives. Sometimes we lose our actual lives. We must not let this man ascend to the highest office in the land when he has always proven that he lets neither facts nor humanity lead his steps.”


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Masks take center stage in presidential race as Biden slams Trump for ‘costing people’s lives’

Published

on

In an interview with CNN's Dana Bash on Tuesday, former Vice President Joe Biden laid into President Donald Trump for his comments belittling his decision to wear a mask at the Memorial Day events at the beginning of the week.

"He's a fool, an absolute fool to talk that way," said Biden. He added that "This macho stuff ... It's costing people's lives."

Trump has frequently refused to don a mask while speaking to the media, even when he is in public places where masks are required.

Watch below:

“He’s a fool, an absolute fool to talk that way,” Biden to @DanaBashCNN about Trump belittling his wearing of a mask. “This macho stuff ... It’s costing people’s lives.”

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump says he can ‘absolutely’ force governors to reopen churches if he decides to do so

Published

on

At Tuesday's coronavirus press briefing, President Donald Trump was pressed on whether he really has the authority to force governors to allow houses of worship to reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic. "Can you explain what authority you had in mind when you said that you would do that?" asked a reporter.

The president emphasized that he does have the power — but did not elaborate on how specifically he would do so, and added that he doesn't think he will have to.

"I can absolutely do it if I want to," said Trump. "I don't think I'm going to have to, because it's starting to open up. We need our churches and our synagogues and our mosques. We want them open, churches, synagogues, mosques, and other — we want them open and we want them open as soon as possible."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Trump continues pushing conspiracy theories about Joe Scarborough — immediately after reporter tells him about widower begging him to stop

Published

on

At Tuesday's White House press briefing, President Donald Trump was asked by reporters if he was aware of the letter from the widower of deceased congressional aide Lori Klausutis, begging the president to stop promoting conspiracy theories that she had been murdered by former representative and MSNBC host Joe Scarborough.

The president replied, "Yeah I have." However, almost immediately after, he used the moment to continue pushing the conspiracy theory, adding, "As you know, there's no statute of limitations."

Asked if he's seen the distressed letter from the widower of Lori Klausutis about Trump turning her death into fodder, Trump says "yeah I have," then continues propagating his conspiracy nonsense, then says, "As you know, there's no statute of limitations."

Continue Reading
 
 
You need honest news coverage. Help us deliver it. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1. Go ad-free.
close-image