Quantcast
Connect with us

Half of governor races still too close to call

Published

on

At least half of the dozen U.S. governorships being decided on Tuesday remain too close to call, though political experts agree both Republicans and Democrats could gain seats in states they would seem unlikely to win.

The razor-thin margins mirror a tightening of opinion polls in the U.S. presidential race and a number of U.S. Senate contests in the final days of an unpredictable election year.

ADVERTISEMENT

Several of the gubernatorial match-ups “can be moved by the slightest breeze,” said Jennifer Duffy, senior editor at The Cook Political Report, which provides non-partisan election analysis. “Both parties right now won’t even take a guess at what they’re going to pick up.”

She said the outcome of the vote is not expected to dramatically alter the 31-18 advantage Republicans have over Democrats in the states’ executive offices. Alaska has an independent governor.

In this year’s marquee race, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory, a Republican, is fighting for a second four-year term against Democratic challenger Roy Cooper, the state’s attorney general.

McCrory has been dogged by the economic backlash against a law he signed in March that restricts bathroom rights for transgender people and limits non-discrimination protections for gays and lesbians.

ADVERTISEMENT

However, his re-election bid appears to have benefited from his administration’s response to record flooding in North Carolina after Hurricane Matthew last month.

“I’m not writing McCrory off,” Duffy said in a phone interview.

Most of the other toss-up races are Democratic-held open seats, and they could lead to some surprises.

ADVERTISEMENT

Republicans may have their best chance at picking up a seat in Vermont, which is expected to vote overwhelmingly for Democrat Hillary Clinton in the presidential race. Republican Lieutenant Governor Phil Scott appears to have the edge over Democrat Sue Minter, a former state transportation secretary.

And in West Virginia, where Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump could get his biggest win, billionaire Democratic businessman Jim Justice has lead in polls over Republican state Senate President Bill Cole.

“There’s going to be a lot of ticket-splitting in those races,” said Kyle Kondik, managing editor of Sabato’s Crystal Ball at the University of Virginia Center for Politics. “It’s just a question of how much ticket-splitting there is.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Republicans are battling to defend the governorship in Indiana, which became an open race after Trump tapped Governor Mike Pence as his running mate.

That contest and the open seat in Missouri also remain tight, and Kondik said the Republican gubernatorial candidates could be helped if Trump gained a late boost in support.

“Just like 2014, there really are hard calls that could go one way or another,” Kondik said.

ADVERTISEMENT

(Editing by Frank McGurty; and Alistair Bell)


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Elections 2016

Betsy DeVos, Ben Carson send anti-trans signals to Trump’s evangelical base

Published

on

While Trump grabs headlines, his Cabinet members quietly use transphobia to shore up white evangelical support

The white evangelical vote is almost certainly a lock for Donald Trump in 2020, but it appears the president is taking no chances of losing this critical voting block. One major part of that strategy appears to be quietly deploying his Cabinet members, especially those associated with the Christian right, to generate stories highlighting the Trump administration's overt bigotry toward trans people, and its eagerness to deprive trans Americans of basic rights.

Just this week, both Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson snagged coverage by making community visits that were ostensibly for noble purposes, but were clearly meant to signal to Christian right voters their hostility to trans rights.

Continue Reading

Elections 2016

Intelligence official directly contradicts Trump administration’s excuses for suppressing whistleblower

Published

on

A top official in the intelligence community has disputed the factual basis for the Trump administration’s suppression of a whistleblower complaint believed to regard the potential misconduct of the president himself, a new letter released Thursday revealed.

The letter was made public by House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-CA). He is locked into a fierce and potentially explosive dispute with an array of forces within the administration to obtain the complaint, which was made through proper channels by an intelligence official last month to the community’s inspector general. Intelligence Community Inspector General Michael Atkinson determined that the complaint was “credible” and “urgent,” and subsequent reporting from the Washington Post found that it concerns a “promise” made by Trump in communication with a foreign leader.

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Longtime GOP strategist explains why his party is getting crushed in the war of ideas

Published

on

Republican strategist Stuart Stevens on Wednesday warned the GOP that Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) might not be a pushover candidate against President Donald Trump in 2020.

Writing on Twitter, Stevens admitted that he had "no idea" if Warren would beat Trump next year, but he did say that "Trump and supporters are destroying [the] credibility of any center-right argument" thanks to Trump's "corrupt and unstable" governance.

When one of Stevens' followers said that Warren would not be able to fulfill her promises just by taxing the wealthy, he countered that this idea is still more popular than anything Republicans are championing.

Continue Reading
 
 
Help Raw Story Investigate and Uncover Injustice. Join Raw Story Investigates for $1 and go ad-free.
close-image