Quantcast
Connect with us

Here are 5 policies that Trump is already back-pedaling on

Published

on

Donald Trump (Gage Skidmore/Wikimedia Commons)

Donald Trump made a lot of promises over the course of this campaign. And as his transition learns the ins and outs of government operations, it’s clear the president-elect, and those in his orbit, are reneging on some of the more integral policy platforms he ran on.

Here are all the positions president-elect Trump has qualified (so far):

(READ MORE: Supporters to Trump: break campaign promises at your peril)

ADVERTISEMENT

Repeal and replace Obamacare

Repealing and replacing Obamacare was a rallying cry for Trump supporters throughout his campaign.

“On day one of the Trump Administration, we will ask Congress to immediately deliver a full repeal of Obamacare,” Trump’s website currently reads. And while the president-elect insisted during the CNN-Telemundo Republican debate that he wants to “keep preexisting conditions,” he nonetheless led calls to “repeal and replace Obamacare” throughout the remainder of the campaign.

But after his meeting with President Obama Thursday, Trump said he would consider alternatives to an all-out appeal. “I told him I will look at his suggestions, and out of respect, I will do that,” Trump told the Wall St. Journal.

“Either Obamacare will be amended, or repealed and replaced,” he added.

ADVERTISEMENT

Build a big, beautiful wall—and make Mexico pay

Trump’s core promise, and a familiar refrain by the president-elect. “I will build a great, great wall on our southern border, and I will make Mexico pay for that wall,” Trump said repeatedly. “Mark my words.”

Thursday, Newt Gingrich—who’s reportedly being considered for Trump’s Secretary of State—admitted the president-elect’s promise to get Mexico to pay for it may have been a “campaign device.”

ADVERTISEMENT

“He may not spend much time trying to get Mexico to pay for it,” Gingrich said. “But it was a great campaign device.”

End the “war on coal”

ADVERTISEMENT

One of the major Trump’s sweep through the rust belt during the campaign “end the war on coal.” And likewise, in its 2016 GOP platform, the Republican party vowed to restore coal jobs, dismissing clean energy as part of President Obama’s “war on coal”:

“The Democratic Party does not understand that coal is an abundant, clean, affordable, reliable domestic energy resource. Those who mine it and their families should be protected from the Democratic Party’s radical anti-coal agenda.”

But now it looks like Republican party leaders recognize that bringing coal jobs back is not so simple. Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Friday told the Lexington Herald-Leader it’s “hard to tell” if the government will be able to expand the coal industry in a meaningful way.

ADVERTISEMENT

“We are going to be presenting to the new president a variety of options that could end this assault,” McConnell said. “Whether that immediately brings business back is hard to tell because it’s a private sector activity.”

“A government spending program is not likely to solve the fundamental problem of growth,” McConnell added. “…I support the effort to help these coal counties wherever we can, but that isn’t going to replace whatever was there when we had a vibrant coal industry.”

Deport illegal immigrants through mass deportations

Illegal immigration was another cornerstone of Trump’s campaign. In an interview with CBS’s Scott Pelley last year, Trump talked mass deportation:

ADVERTISEMENT

Trump: If they’ve done well, they’re going out and they’re coming back in legally. Because you said it–

Pelley: You’re rounding them all up?

Trump: We’re rounding ’em up in a very humane way, in a very nice way. And they’re going to be happy because they want to be legalized. And, by the way, I know it doesn’t sound nice. But not everything is nice.

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus Wednesday said Trump is no longer calling for “mass deportation,” and is instead calling for the deportation of criminals.

“He’s not calling for mass deportation,” Priebus said on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.” “He said, ‘No, only people who have committed crimes.’ And then only until all of that is taken care of will we look at what we are going to do next.”

UPDATE:
5. The Iran peace treaty will be gone.

ADVERTISEMENT

In September 2015, Trump said that under his administration he would “renegotiate” the agreement. Trump called the deal the “stupidest deal of all time” and running mate Mike Pence said that the deal would be “ripped up.”

The Times of Israel reports that Trump may not scrap Obama’s Iran nuclear treaty after all.

“Appearing to walk back statements made by president-elect and other advisers,” senior Trump adviser Walid Phares claims that the treaty will instead be “renegotiated.” He also said that Trump might not actually move the US Embassy to Jerusalem immediately.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

2020 Election

Lincoln Project whacks the president: ‘We end COVID when we end Trump’s presidency’

Published

on

President Donald Trump on Thursday held a campaign rally in Wisconsin with supporters "packed in like sardines."

At the rally, Trump ridiculed former Vice President Joe Biden for social distancing at campaign appearances with America's death toll over 200,000. Also on Thursday, Biden held a town hall meeting on CNN where he spoke in-depth about the challenges of a coronavirus vaccine.

The Lincoln Project, the group of former top GOP strategists working to defeat Trump, said that "only one candidate will protect your family from coronavirus" in a new video.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump said he would give UN speech despite pandemic — but reversed course and won’t be attending

Published

on

US President Donald Trump will not attend next week's UN General Assembly gathering in person, his chief of staff told journalists aboard Air Force One Thursday, according to a pool report.

The decision marks an about-face for Trump, who last month said he wanted to deliver his speech in the General Assembly hall in New York, even if other world leaders are staying away due to the coronavirus pandemic.

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows ended the debate once and for all, telling reporters en route to Wisconsin, where Trump was to hold a campaign rally, that the president would not physically attend the General Assembly's 75th session, which will take place mainly by videoconference due to the health crisis.

Continue Reading
 

2020 Election

Trump mocked for 95-minute ‘slurring’ campaign speech — before crowd ‘packed in like sardines’ in Wisconsin

Published

on

President Donald Trump gave a fear-filled and factually inaccurate campaign rally in Mosinee, Wisconsin on Thursday.

The rally, held in spite of the COVID-19 pandemic, featured a large crowd closely packed together.

Here's some of what people were saying about Trump's speech, which lasted approximately 95 minutes:

https://twitter.com/RSBNetwork/status/1306433275381116928

https://twitter.com/bad_takes/status/1306758848577966081

Trump is slurring and sounds tired pic.twitter.com/6MJLw2fpms

Continue Reading