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North Carolina governor unwilling to concede in tight race

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North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory’s campaign criticized his Democratic challenger on Wednesday for claiming victory in the state’s neck-and-neck gubernatorial race, saying tens of thousands of votes had yet to be tallied.

Roy Cooper, the state’s attorney general, declared victory after unofficial election results showed him leading the Republican incumbent by fewer than 5,000 votes in the largest of the 12 U.S. states that elected governors on Tuesday.

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If Cooper’s advantage holds, it would be the only governorship pick-up for Democrats nationally, while Republicans extended their dominance over state executive offices by flipping seats in New Hampshire, Missouri and Vermont.

McCrory’s campaign, however, said the outcome of the North Carolina race will not be known until outstanding absentee, military and provisional ballots are counted, a process expected to extend into next week.

“Claiming an outcome before the process has concluded is irresponsible and disrespectful to the voters of North Carolina whose voices have yet to be heard,” McCrory campaign strategist Chris LaCivita said in a statement.

The campaign and state Republican Party signaled that a legal fight could be ahead, calling into question why some 90,000 early votes in heavily Democratic Durham County were not uploaded until late Tuesday.

LaCivita said Republicans had “grave concerns over potential irregularities” in that county. North Carolina Republican Party Chairman Robin Hayes said dozens of lawyers would be deployed across the state to ensure the validity of every vote cast.

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Democrats said they expected Cooper to maintain his lead.

“Last night, the people of North Carolina chose a new governor with new priorities,” Cooper’s campaign spokesman Ford Porter said.

The race in North Carolina was seen as effectively serving as a referendum on a state law that bans transgender people from using government-run restrooms that correspond with their gender identity and limits protections for gays and lesbians.

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McCrory signed the law, known as House Bill 2, and steadfastly supported its bathroom provision despite the economic backlash against the state after it passed in March.

Cooper called the measure discriminatory and said it should be repealed.

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County elections boards will certify Tuesday’s results on Nov. 18, state election officials said. If the race is decided by 10,000 or fewer votes, a candidate may request a recount.

(Reporting by Colleen Jenkins; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)


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John Hopkins’ coronavirus data indicates that the US could ultimately end up even worse off than Spain and Italy

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Back in January and February, President Donald Trump and his sycophants in the right-wing media insisted that the deadly COVID-19 strain of coronavirus did not pose a major threat to the United States. But according to the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, the U.S. is now #3 in coronavirus deaths. And when one closely examines Hopkins data, it becomes painfully clear that the U.S. might be moving into the #1 position in the weeks ahead — and why Dr. Anthony Fauci, expert immunologist, is warning that the U.S. could be looking at 100,000-240,000 deaths from COVID-19 when all is said and done.

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2020 Election

Anti-science Christians who went ‘all in’ for Trump bear responsibility for COVID-19 crisis: religious extremism expert

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Appearing on MSNBC with host Ayman Mohyeldin, the author of a widely shared New York Times article on the dangerous rise of religious nationalism lambasted religious leaders who are still holding public services when the government is advising social isolation and claimed they are making things worse for the rest of the country.

Speaking with the host, Katherine Stewart, who is also the author of the book "The Power Worshipers," explained that years of anti-science rhetoric from the predominately rightwing evangelical movement is a contributing factor as to why the country is in the throes of a deadly pandemic that may lead to over 250,000 deaths.

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Ex-Homeland Security adviser reveals to The View another Trump coronavirus failure no one’s talking about

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Tom Bossert, a former Homeland Security adviser to President Donald Trump, identified one failure of leadership that has mostly escaped notice during the coronavirus outbreak.

Governors have begged the president to order the manufacture of ventilators and other medical equipment under the Defense Production Act, which Trump has already invoked, but Bossert said he must also anticipate another need to eventually end the pandemic.

"This is a massive, complicated logistics challenge at this point, and, you know, Gov. [Gavin] Newsom and others will tell you that it's not just about large-scale purchasing," Bossert said. "It's about deciding who needs it and whose priority should trump others because this is a scarcity of resource problem at this point. We're kind of past what we would have, could have and should have done, and we're making decisions about who gets what when and why. That's the trick."

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