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‘We will not give an inch’: Elizabeth Warren throws down gauntlet to President-elect Trump

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U.S. Democrats’ liberal firebrand, Senator Elizabeth Warren, threw down the gauntlet to President-elect Donald Trump on Thursday, telling labor union members there are financial and social issues where her party will fight him and continuing to blast the Republican.

Battling bigotry is the first job for Democrats after the election, said Warren, of Massachusetts, giving a sense of how her party will operate now that it no longer controls the White House and remains the minority in both chambers of Congress.

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“We will fight back against attacks on Latinos, African Americans, women, Muslims, immigrants, disabled Americans – on anyone,” said Warren, who sparred frequently over Twitter with Trump and criticized him on the campaign trail in the weeks leading up to Tuesday’s election. “Whether Donald Trump sits in a glass tower or sits in the White House, we will not give an inch on this, not now, not ever.”

She said Trump had “encouraged a toxic stew of hatred and fear” and during the campaign “regularly made statements that undermined core values of our democracy.”

In the speech to the AFL-CIO labor federation, Warren also said Democrats will resist attempts to loosen financial regulation, “gut” the Dodd-Frank Wall Street reform law and eliminate the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).

“If Trump and the Republican Party try to turn loose the big banks and financial institutions so they can once again gamble with our economy and bring it all crashing down, then we will fight them every step of the way,” she said.

Warren did highlight areas of agreement. She said “count me in” on Trump’s support of a new Glass-Steagall law to separate investment and retail banking, reforming trade deals, maintaining Social Security benefits, helping on childcare and college costs and rebuilding infrastructure.

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Warren rose to lead the liberal wing of the party during the 2007-2009 financial crisis. After Republicans blocked President Barack Obama’s attempt to appoint her as the first director of the CFPB, she won a seat in Congress.

In 2015, progressive groups and a political action committee pressed her to run for president. Since Trump’s victory on Tuesday, many have already renewed their calls, for the 2020 presidential election.

(Reporting by Lisa Lambert; Editing by Meredith Mazzilli)

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Newspapers line up to demand the impeachment of President Donald Trump

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So far, 52.3 percent of Americans believe that President Donald Trump should be impeached. Major newspapers are following the public outcry as well.

The Washington Post: ImpeachLos Angeles Times: ImpeachBoston Globe: ImpeachOrlando Sentinel: ImpeachPhiladelphia Inquirer: ImpeachUSA Today: ImpeachTampa Bay Times: Impeach

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Matt Gaetz compared top Florida leaders in history — who were actually respectable

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Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-FL) made news Thursday when he went after former Vice President Joe Biden's son for past drug problems. While many families are fighting the drug war, Gaetz family faced a problem when he was pulled over by police just two years before running for office in Florida.

"I don’t want to make light of anybody’s substance abuse issues,” Gaetz said Thursday before making light of the younger Biden's substance abuse issues.

Rep. Hank Johnson (D-GA) said it was the perfect example of the "pot calling the kettle black."

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Trump’s mental derangement suggests he experienced abuse in childhood: psychiatrist

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President Donald Trump's outlandish behavior is the result of childhood trauma that he has not worked through, "Couples Therapy" star Dr. Jenn Mann told TMZ.

"One, he's someone who gets triggered easily," she explained. "Two, he has terrible impulse control, very poor impulse control. Developmentally, his ability to control his impulses ... he's almost like a young child."

"Take me back to the childhood, what do you think caused this?" the reporter asked. "What caused -- this?"

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