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Journalist among 16 arrested as protestors storm NC General Assembly over ‘shameful’ special session

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A journalist for North Carolina Policy Watch was among at least 16 arrested Thursday at the North Carolina Legislative Building after protestors disrupted the state House and Senate during what watchdog groups are dubbing a “shameful” and “deceitful” special session, WRAL reports.

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The special session, convened Wednesday under the guise of providing aide to victims of Hurricane Mathew, morphed into what Democrats are calling a “power grab” after the late-night meeting resulted in 28 proposed bill, including two that would explicitly limit governor-elect Roy Cooper’s authority when he takes office in January. Among the proposed bills is SB4, which would reshape the state board of elections, limiting Cooper’s power regarding electoral oversight. Another is HB17, which would require Senate confirmation for the governor’s cabinet appointments, and make 1,200 workers appointed by current Governor Pat McCrory permanent state employees. “This is a power grab. Call it what it is,” Sen. Floyd McKissick (D-Durham) said about SB4. “If McCrory had won, would we be here today?” Democrats and watchdog groups warn the special session is a clear attempt by North Caorlina Republicans to undermine Cooper after a hard-fought election which McCrory was reluctant to concede. “These shameful partisan tricks undermine the will of North Carolina voters, waste precious taxpayer dollars, and will further erode the public’s trust in our state government,” ACLU-NC executive director Karen Anderson said in a statement. As the special session continued into Thursday, protestors chanting “all political power comes from the people” disrupted the North Carolina General Assembly. Officials told protestors to clear the building, threatening them with arrest if they failed to comply.

Among those arrested was Joe Killian, an investigative reporter for NC Policy Watch, who live-tweeted his arrest.

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In a joint statement, NC Justice Center Executive Director Rick Glazieer and NC Policy Watch Director Chris Fitzsimon said they were sure the judicial process would “find our reporter was simply exercising his right to cover the news as it was unfolding in front of him.”

“He was simply covering the incident and was arrested when he refused to stop covering the news,” the statement reads.

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Watch the video below, via WRAL:


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‘They want their civil war’: Far-right ‘boogaloo’ militants have embedded themselves in the George Floyd protests in Minneapolis

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Young, white men dressed in Hawaiian-style print shirts and body armor, and carrying high-powered rifles have been a notable feature at state capitols, lending an edgy and even sometimes insurrectionary tone to gatherings of conservatives angered by restrictions on businesses and church gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic.

Just as many states are reopening their economies — and taking the wind out of the conservative protests — the boogaloo movement found a new galvanizing cause: the protests in Minneapolis against the police killing of George Floyd.

A new iteration of the militia movement, boogaloo was born out of internet forums for gun enthusiasts that repurposed the 1984 movie Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo as a code for a second civil war, and then modified it into phrases like “big luau” to create an insular community for those in on the joke, with Hawaiian-style shirts functioning as an in-real-life identifier. Boogaloo gained currency as an internet meme over the summer of 2019, when it was adopted by white supremacists in the accelerationist tendency. In January, the movement made the leap from the internet to the streets when a group boogaloo-ers showed up at the Second Amendment rally in Richmond, Va.

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WATCH: Man holds black DoorDash driver at gunpoint for delivering food to an Arizona apartment complex

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A man in Mesa, Arizona, is facing assault and weapons charges after he allegedly held a delivery driver at gunpoint this Sunday, 12News reports.

Police say Valentino Tejeda pulled a gun on 24-year-old Dimitri Mills in the parking lot of Tejeda's apartment complex, and when Mills and his girlfriend tried to explain they were making a food delivery to a neighbor, Tejeda still insisted that Mills, who is black, was somehow a threat.

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Trump became enthralled with presidency while watching balloons drop on 1988 GOP convention stage

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Donald Trump became enthralled with the presidency while watching balloons drop for George H.W. Bush at the 1988 Republican National Convention.

The celebrity real estate developer had been taken to New Orleans by his longtime pal Roger Stone, a Republican political operative hoping to spark an interest in Trump to run for the presidency, reported Politico.

“I got the definite impression that Roger Stone was preparing Donald Trump to run for president,” said Michael Caputo, a Stone associate who worked for Trump's 2016 campaign. “I didn’t know when it would be — but it was very clear to me that he wasn’t there for the cocktails.”

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