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Pro-Trump ‘Pizzagate’ troll smears humorist with more phony ‘child sex ring’ charges

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A notorious “alt-right” online troll and “pick-up artist” is trying to smear a liberal humorist and producer with phony pedophilia charges in an online feud that has begun to have real-world consequences, said the Daily Beast on Monday.

Far-right nuisance blogger Mike Cernovich had a key role in spreading the “Pizzagate” conspiracy theory, which alleged that Hillary Clinton and other Democratic operatives were running a child sex ring out of a network of tunnels underneath a Washington, D.C. pizza parlor.

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This month, a Pizzagate believer showed up at the restaurant in question — Comet Ping Pong, which features pizza and ping pong tables — with an assault rifle and opened fire. He later told police he was “investigating” the rumors of a child sex ring in the restaurant.

Now Cernovich is leveling startlingly similar charges against Vic Berger of the video production company Super Deluxe. Berger’s videos about the election earned him profiles in Wired and The New Yorker.

“Weeks ago, Berger posted a video of Cernovich into which he’d inserted requisite funny sound effects,” said the Daily Beast’s Luke O’Neil. “In the weeks following the video’s release, Cernovich and Berger insulted each other on Twitter without real-world consequence.”

However, when Cernovich posted a photo of himself with his newborn daughters, he claims he received taunting messages containing “pedophilia jokes” from two Twitter users who are among the 33,200 users follow Berger.

This sent Cernovich into a rage. He posted a series of videos alleging — while offering no proof whatsoever — that Berger, like Hillary Clinton, is a kingpin in the world of child sex trafficking. He called for investigations of Berger by Child Protective Services and accused him of having “pedophile friends.”

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“Wow. The guy who pals around on Twitter with pedos allegedly has kids,” he said in one tweet. “If true I may have to call Child Protection Services.”

Berger has since received numerous threats and has been bombarded online by Cernovich’s thousands of alt-right followers. He asked Twitter for help against the libelous charges before deciding to take a break from the website.

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“I know that many threats are just assholes online, but after Pizzagate—which Mike pushes, of course—and the guy shooting inside the pizza place last week, I’m nervous to not take anything seriously,” Berger said to the Daily Beast.

“I reported some of the tweets before he deleted them and Twitter only responded once saying it didn’t violate their terms of service. He started tweeting at (comedian) Michael Ian Black, too, about me, and some other people,” he explained. “(He was) just really trying to smear me.”

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“Cernovich shows like 5 tweets of me responding to this guy over the years as if that’s proof he is my best friend. Oh, and on the Periscope, he said my followers call themselves ‘Vic’s Boys’ or something like that. Like that’s what the name of my child sex ring is,” Berger said to O’Neil.


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The ‘War on Christmas’ was started more than 500 years ago — by Christians

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If it feels like the “War on Christmas” is getting really old, it is. Almost 15 years have passed since Bill O’Reilly first opened December with a segment called, “Christmas Under Siege”—ten long years in which his cadences and refrains and echoing chorus have become as familiar to most Americans as Handel’s Messiah. More familiar, in fact.

Not that O’Reilly invented the idea. During the 1920’s, Henry Ford’s newspaper published a series of anti-Semitic articles titled, “The International Jew: The World’s Foremost Problem.” Among the complaints:

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Surprise! IG report finds anti-Clinton bias at the FBI

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The Justice Department inspector general's report debunked President Donald Trump’s repeated claims that the FBI’s Russia probe was launched out of anti-Trump bias by FBI leaders. Conversely, it did find anti-Hillary Clinton bias among FBI agents.

Trump claimed for years that the FBI investigation was opened because of anti-Trump bias by FBI leaders, citing text messages sent between former top FBI counterintelligence agent Peter Strzok and former FBI lawyer Lisa Page that criticized him during the 2016 campaign. Inspector General Michael Horowitz concluded that neither Strzok nor Page were in a position to start an investigation into Trump’s campaign and concluded that the FBI probe was justified, refuting claims that the probe was opened because of bias by the FBI’s top officials.

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Here are 5 huge lies Republicans are telling about the new report on the Russia probe

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Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz's new report on the origins of Crossfire Hurricane, commonly called the Russia investigation, blew up many of the right wing's favorite talking points and conspiracy theories about the FBI. At the same time, it exposed real failures of procedures meant to protect American citizens against undue surveillance and exposed the need for serious law enforcement reforms.

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