Quantcast
Connect with us

Rachel Maddow refuses to let Kellyanne Conway dance around Trump’s terrible treatment of the press

Published

on

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow on Thursday needled former Donald Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway over the president-elect’s notoriously volatile relationship with the press, reminding the senior advisor that Trump himself not only frequently singles out reporters and news networks to criticize, but his inner circle also relentlessly attacks the press in myriad ways.

ADVERTISEMENT

After Maddow pointed out that Trump encouraged his rally crowd to target Martha Raddatz over false claims the reporter cried the night he was elected, Conway tried to insist everyone on Trump’s team has “enormous respect” for Raddatz, whom they all agree is a “tour de force.”

Maddow reminded Conway that “telling a story about her that is not true” to crowds of thousands throughout the United States is hardly indicative of “enormous respect” and asked if Raddatz could expect an apology sometime soon. Conway insisted those types of conversations don’t happen in public.

“The accusation was made publicly,” Maddow pressed.

Conway quickly changed the topic, instead discussing Trump’s “relationship with the press” and the “negative press coverage” she says marred his campaign.

Conway said it was frustrating to be in “Trump World” and unable to control the narrative, which is partly why Trump enjoyed his campaign rallies, even continuing them several weeks after he was elected president.

ADVERTISEMENT

“They’re his way of being the master communicator,” Conway said.

Maddow turned to Melania Trump’s pending lawsuit against the Daily Mail, noting Charles Harder, the same lawyer who Trump transition team member Peter Thiel hired to take down Gawker, is representing the soon-to-be first lady in her libel suit. Thiel’s vindictive bankrolling of Hulk Hogan’s lawsuit against Gawker, as well as Harder’s approach to the suit, were novel means of targeting a specific publication with the explicit intention of putting it out of business.

“Is that going to continue under a Trump administration?” Maddow asked.

ADVERTISEMENT

Conway, who told Maddow she has a very good relationship with the press, said “the goal here is to tell the truth,” insisting Melania Trump was “slandered and maligned” and deserves the chance to clear her name.

Maddow asked if the goal of Melania Trump’s lawsuit is to make critical publications disappear in the same manner as Gawker.

ADVERTISEMENT

“[Gawker] made themselves disappear by lying, and not settling, and being arrogant,” Conway responded.

For the record, Gawker did not lie. The suit against the company was over an invasion-of-privacy claim made by Hogan over a sex tape the gossip blog famously published in 2012; Thiel funded the suit, at least in part, over a decade-old beef with the news organization, which outed the him as gay in 2007.

“The goal here is to punish and call out people who lie about Melania Trump,” Conway continued, later adding if news organizations don’t want to be sued they can “stop lying about Melania Trump.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Maddow pointed out that all presidents think the press is lying about them, or misrepresenting their positions, or maligning them in some way, noting it comes with the territory of being president.

“I’ve never seen a First Family … trying to put newspapers out of business through a novel legal strategy,” Maddow said.

Conway immediately pivoted: “Do you know what we were discussing eight years ago around this time? We weren’t discussing any negative stuff that was associated with President-elect Obama.”

“It’s just different for the Trumps,” she insisted.

ADVERTISEMENT

Watch the whole interview below, via MSNBC:


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Trump is now ‘more dangerous than Nixon’ — and an ‘existential threat to democracy’: Watergate prosecutor

Published

on

Jill Wine-Banks, now 76, has vivid memories of Richard Nixon’s presidency and the Watergate scandal: the Chicago-born attorney was part of the U.S. Department of Justice’s Watergate prosecution team and reported to Special Prosecutor Leon Jaworski. In recent months, Wine-Banks has had much to say about the Ukraine scandal and the impeachment of President Donald Trump — and when she appeared on Lawrence O’Donnell’s show on MSNBC on Monday night, February 24, she explained why she believes that Trump is more dangerous than Nixon.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Texas man assaulted girlfriend for speaking Spanish: police affidavit

Published

on

A Texas man has been arrested for allegedly assaulting his girlfriend for speaking Spanish.

Local news station Fox 7 Austin reports that 46-year-old Rogelio Moreno Lara was charged this week with "continuous violence," a third-degree felony, for his alleged assault against his girlfriend, who told police that he has regularly demanded that she only speak English.

According to Fox 7 Austin, the woman told police that Lara earlier this month "got up from the living room couch and got on top of her on the bed and grabbed her head by her hair with two hands and shook her head while telling her not to speak Spanish anymore." She also said that "he pulled her hair for about 15 seconds and slapped her once."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

‘This is outrageous’: Legal experts condemn Trump for demanding Sotomayor and Ginsburg recusals

Published

on

President Donald Trump Monday night called on Supreme Court Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg recuse themselves from any cases involving the president, a demand critics denounced as an "outrageous" attack on the nation's highest legal body.

"Justice Sotomayor issued a reasoned dissent noting a pattern among the justices of allowing the Trump administration to ignore the appellate courts and skip to the SCOTUS to secure their desired outcome."—Kristen Clarke, Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law

Trump's demand came in response to Sotomayor's scathing dissent in the Supreme Court's 5-4 decision to allow the president's so-called "wealth test" for immigrants—also known as the public charge rule—to take effect in Illinois. Sotomayor accused the court's five conservative justices of favoring one litigant over all others—the Trump administration—in their ruling.

Continue Reading
 
 
close-image