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Racist post about Michelle Obama sparks West Virginia review of nonprofit

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West Virginia will review its contracts with a state- and federally funded nonprofit whose director called first lady Michelle Obama “an ape in heels,” the governor’s office said on Tuesday.

The state move came after the social services group, Clay County Development Corp, reinstated director Pamela Taylor. She stepped down last month after her Facebook comment about Obama sparked outrage.

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“The State of West Virginia vehemently opposes any discriminatory and harassing sentiments, language or actions,” the office of Governor Earl Ray Tomblin, a Democrat, said in a statement.

Because of Taylor’s comments, “we have been and continue to review those contracts to determine any alternatives the state might have,” it said.

The Clay County Development Corp provides financial assistance and senior services to low-income and elderly residents.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reported that the nonprofit received about $1.5 million in federal funding and $363,000 in state funding in 2014. A spokesman for Clay County Development Corp could not be reached for comment.

After the Nov. 8 election, Taylor had praised the change from Obama to former model Melania Trump, the wife of President-elect Donald Trump, a Republican.

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“It will be refreshing to have a classy, beautiful, dignified first lady back in the White House. I’m tired of seeing an ape in heels,” she wrote.

Beverly Whaling, the mayor of tiny Clay, West Virginia, resigned after coming under fire for replying to Taylor’s Facebook comment, “Just made my day Pam.”

The state medical and senior services bureaus said in a Dec. 7 letter to Clay County Development Corp that they needed assurances that harassment and discrimination would be not be tolerated.

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The agencies also sought guarantees that Taylor and other employees had not discriminated against people getting state services. A copy of the letter was provided to Reuters by the Bureau of Senior Services.

(Reporting by Ian Simpson in Washington; Editing by Jonathan Oatis)

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The earth’s oldest asteroid strike discovered in Western Australia — and it may have triggered a global thaw

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The world’s oldest remaining asteroid crater is at a place called Yarrabubba, southeast of the town of Meekatharra in Western Australia.

Our new study puts a precise age on the cataclysmic impact – showing Yarrabubba is the oldest known crater and dating it at the right time to trigger the end of an ancient glacial period and the warming of the entire planet.

What we found at Yarrabubba

Yarrrabubba holds the eroded remnants of a crater 70 kilometres wide that was first described in 2003, based on minerals at the site that showed unique signs of impact. But its true age was not known.

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Can’t do what you need to do in a public toilet? You’re not alone – and there’s help

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Most of us don’t give much thought to going to the toilet. We go when we need to go.

But for a small minority of people, the act of urinating or defecating can be a major source of anxiety – especially when public restrooms are the only facilities available.

Paruresis (shy bladder) and parcopresis (shy bowel) are little known mental health conditions, yet they can significantly compromise a person’s quality of life.

We don’t know how many people have shy bowel, but research has estimated around 2.8%-16.4% of the population are affected by shy bladder. The condition is more common in males.

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Peru to install cameras at Machu Picchu after damage

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Peru is installing security cameras at its world renowned Machu Picchu site after it was damaged earlier this month by foreign tourists, authorities said Tuesday.

"We are going to strengthen security at Machu Picchu by installing high-tech cameras," Jose Bastante, head of the archeological park, told AFP.

Bastante said 18 cameras will be located at three strategic points of the citadel as well as access points from surrounding mountains.

"This will allow us to better control visitors and avoid any action or infraction to the regulations, also any type of risk," he said, adding that drones were also being used for security.

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