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‘Give me a break’: Rep. Elijah Cummings slams Sessions’ recusal — and asks him to resign

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Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) isn’t interested in Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ recusal. The ranking member on the Government Reform and Oversight Committee wants to see Sessions resign.

In an interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, Cummings questioned how far Sessions’ recusal will go. Sessions told reporters that he will recuse himself for anything involving Russia and Donald Trump’s campaign. He did not indicate if it would include ties that surfaced after the election or now that Trump is in the White House.

Cummings railed against Sessions saying that Democrats have been asking that he recuse himself from the second he took the oath for his confirmation hearing.

“Suddenly, now, he says because he’s talked to his ethics people that he is going to recuse himself,” Cummings continued. “They say — they told him he should do it because he was involved in the campaign. Give me a break. He is the number one law enforcement officer in the country. He has been a U.S. Attorney for the state of Alabama, and as an attorney, he knows and I know that there are certain things that you don’t have to talk to the ethics people about.”

Cummings argued that when someone comes before a committee, every syllable stated is important.

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“I found it interesting that he got a memory today,” Cummings continued. The comment is in reference to Sessions’ claim that he recalled the meeting. “That was very interesting, that he remembered some things and he didn’t remember other things.”

He went on to say that another thing he found concerning was that when they come before the committee and say that they forgot something under sworn testimony and they want to correct it they usually do so with a written statement. That didn’t happen in Sessions’ case.

“I don’t think this would have ever come out if it were not for the drip-drab of the press bringing these things out,” he concluded. “And, so, I’m still concerned. I do not think it was enough. I think he left a lot of questions unanswered.”

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Cummings is also concerned about why Sessions didn’t recuse himself well before this.

“He’s been sitting around, I guess, talking to Comey and others,” Cummings said. “We don’t know what he knows. It’s going to be interesting what he sends to the Judiciary Committee to try to clear the record. But I can tell you that I’m still not satisfied. I’m concerned, and I think that we as a country and we as a judicial system are better than that.”

Watch the full interview below:


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Nicolle Wallace explains Trump’s racist attacks are covering his cozy relationship with Jeffrey Epstein and Michael Cohen scandal

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MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace began her Wednesday show saying that President Donald Trump has made it official by making his brand one of "racism." But it prompted her to wonder if his racist attacks against four congresswomen of color could be more about deflecting from other scandals.

Wednesday morning, MSNBC released a video of Trump partying with alleged child molester and rapist Jeffrey Epstein. Trump is seen groping women and slapping their posterior. The first round of Epstein's alleged crimes were downgraded by Labor Secretary Alex Acosta and he was given 13 months in a county jail for just 8 hours, six days a week.

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Trump wasn’t the first president to confront the Supreme Court – and back down

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A key presidential election is approaching. The U.S. Supreme Court hears a case with powerful political implications. The court rules, but the populist president doesn’t care. Our national commitments – to the Constitution, to morality, to the rule of law – seem at risk.Then, the president backs down. The nation survives.

This might be the story of President Trump’s short-lived threat to get a citizenship question on the census in defiance of the Supreme Court. Instead, it’s the story of President Andrew Jackson and Worcester v. Georgia, decided in 1832.

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Fatal drug overdoses drop in US for first time in decades

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Fatal drug overdoses in the US declined by 5.1 percent in 2018, according to preliminary official data released Wednesday, the first drop in two decades.

The trend was driven by a steep decline in deaths linked to prescription painkillers.

"The latest provisional data on overdose deaths show that America's united efforts to curb opioid use disorder and addiction are working," Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said, though he cautioned the epidemic would not be cured overnight.

The total number of estimated deaths dropped to 68,557 in 2018 against 72,224 the year before, according to the figures released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

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