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‘Tell us who you’re apologizing to’: Wolf Blitzer lectures abashed Sean Spicer over Hitler comments

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White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer on Tuesday apologized for his false claim that Adolf Hitler “didn’t even sink” to Syrian dictator Bashar al-Assad’s use of chemical weapons, calling his words, “misstated, insensitive and wrong.”

Speaking with the press secretary hours several hours after the presser, Blitzer—the former editor of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s monthly publication—asked Spicer what compelled him to bring up Hitler in the first place.

“Why did you even make that comparison?” Blitzer wondered.

Spicer responded that during the press conference he made an “inappropriate and insensitive reference to the Holocaust,” adding, “It was a mistake to do that.” The press secretary said he was “trying to make a point about the heinous acts Assad” committed.

“Tell us who you’re apologizing to,” Blitzer pressed Spicer, noting there are Holocaust survivors out there who “couldn’t believe the press secretary … could make such a statement.”

“I’m not in any way standing by them,” Spicer replied, iterating that his comments were “insensitive and inappropriate” and he “should have stayed focused” on Donald Trump’s missile attack on a Syrian air base.

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Blitzer wasn’t convinced. “Why bring Hitler into this?” the CNN host asked.

“It was a mistake, I shouldn’t have done it,” Spicer replied, later adding, “It was an attempt to do something that shouldn’t have been done.”

Blitzer questioned whether Spicer knew there were gas chambers where Nazis killed millions of innocent people using chemicals.

“Yes, clearly I’m aware of that,” Spicer said.

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At the end of the interview, Blitzer pointed out that this wasn’t the first time the press secretary has stated falsehoods, even if it did result in a rare apology from Spicer.

“Are you worried that you have a credibility problem?” Blitzer asked Spicer.

The press secretary said his comments were “misstated, insensitive and wrong” and told Blitzer all he can do is ask for forgiveness. Blitzer replied that it was important Spicer came out and apologize for his comments.

Watch the video below, via CNN:

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The View piles on Dem hopeful Marianne Williamson for ducking anti-vaxx questions: ‘You’re making people paranoid!’

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Panelists on "The View" hammered Democratic presidential candidate Marianne Williamson for giving ambiguous answers about mandatory vaccinations.

The long-shot candidate has apologized for describing vaccination mandates as "draconian" and "Orwellian," saying she believes vaccines are important but understands public skepticism, and co-host Meghan McCain asked her to square those views with her advocacy for children.

"This sounds a lot like Trump, just so we're clear, this is his message," McCain said. "You're talking a lot about children of America, the children, how much you care about children, you also just came out as the anti-vaxxer candidate."

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Senate delivers stinging bipartisan rebuke to Trump — and blocks Saudi arms sales

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The Trump White House suffered a stinging defeat on Thursday when a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers voted to block sales of American arms to Saudi Arabia.

The vote in favor of blocking the arms sales received affirmative votes from all Senate Democrats, as well as votes from Sens. Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Susan Collins (R-ME), Jerry Moran (R-KS), Lisa Murkowski (R-AK), Rand Paul (R-KY), Mike Lee (R-UT) and Todd Young (R-IN).

Graham, who is usually one of President Donald Trump's staunchest allies, said he voted for the bill because he believed the United States could not ignore the behavior of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammad Bin Salman, as well as the Saudi government's killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

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UN Khashoggi report piles pressure on Saudi crown prince

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Saudi Arabia has sought to move on from the scandal triggered by journalist Jamal Khashoggi's murder, but a UN expert's report implicating its crown prince has heaped pressure back on the kingdom, analysts say.

UN special rapporteur Agnes Callamard's report, released Wednesday, insists there is "credible evidence" to warrant further investigation and financial sanctions against Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman over Khashoggi's murder last October.

The 101-page document, which details the dissident's murder by Saudi agents at the country's Istanbul consulate, has cast a renewed spotlight on the case just as the de facto ruler appeared to be emerging from the scandal.

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