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Republicans don’t like the Trumpcare bill but are voting anyway because they know it will die in the Senate

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Moderate and far-right Republicans dislike parts of the so-called “Trumpcare” bill that the U.S. House of Representatives is set to bring to a vote on Thursday — but they plan to vote for it anyway in hopes that the Senate will change it or strike it down.

The party so desperately needs a political win of some kind, Politico said, that they’re ready to vote on “a bill that will not make it to the president’s office” in order to pantomime the process of striking down the Affordable Healthcare Act — former President Barack Obama’s signature domestic policy achievement — and score political points with their base.

“We like the fact that it [the ACA] needs to be repealed,” said Scott Reed, chief strategist at pro-business lobbying group the U.S. Chamber of Commerce — when asked whether they support the legislation. “… We need to move the process forward.”

“This thing is going to go to the United States Senate. It’s going to change in my view,” said Rep. Tom Cole (R-OK) to NPR. “At some point you just have to move, and we think this is it. This will create some momentum.”

The American Medical Association (AMA) and U.S. hospitals have spoken out against the the Republican bill, which stands to strip away coverage from more than 24 million Americans.

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In the process of selling the American Healthcare Act (ACHA) to Congress, House Speaker U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) and White House officials have assured House members that the Senate version of the bill will look very different than the bill they intend to put to vote on Thursday.

“We have to have a win on this,” one White House official told Politico. “We don’t have a choice.”

“The problem is they’re voting on a bill that will not make it to the president’s office,” said Joe Antos — healthcare director for conservative think tank the American Enterprise Institute. He conceded, however, that Thursday’s vote could be a starting point, saying, “It could facilitate some bill making it to the president’s desk.”

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Trump defenders argued his latest tweets weren’t really racist — but he just completely undercut their arguments

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Donald Trump in coal helmet thumbs up

If you try to defend President Donald Trump, you will always end up having the rug pulled out from underneath you. It's a law of nature.

And yet, so many of the president's allies have failed to learn this simple lesson. So when Trump launched a new attack at progressive Democratic lawmakers that was one of his most obviously racist smears, inevitably, some of his defenders tried to deny the obvious truth.

His screed attacked a group of women who have come to define the left wing of the Democratic caucus, which includes Reps. Ilhan Omar (MN), Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (NY), Rashida Talib (MI), and Ayanna Pressley (MA). Though only Omar is an immigrant (she was a refugee from Somalia as a child), Trump seemed to assume all four women of color weren't born in the United States, and most egregiously, he suggested they should "go back" to other countries:

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Trump is facing massive criticism for his attacks on young women of color in Congress

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US President Donald Trump came under fire from Democrats and even some members of his own Republican Party on Monday after launching an extraordinary xenophobic attack on four progressive Democratic congresswomen.

"All they do is complain," Trump told reporters at a White House event featuring products "Made in America."

"These are people that hate our country," he said of the four lawmakers. "If you're not happy here, you can leave."

Trump also accused the four first-term congresswomen -- who are of Hispanic, Arab, Somali and African American origin -- of having "love" for US "enemies like Al-Qaeda."

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Trump’s campaign is spending massively at his own businesses — and even more on lawyers

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President Donald Trump's 2020 re-election campaign filed their latest campaign finance reports on Monday.

Anna Massoglia, a researcher at the money in politics watchdog group Open Secrets, dissected the numbers and made two startling discoveries.

In the three months covered, from April through June, Trump's campaign and affiliated joint fundraising committees spent $326,094.24 at Trump businesses, including six figures at both Mar-a-Lago and Trump Hotel DC.

Trump's campaign also spent over $1.3 million on legal bills. He spent approximately $7 million on legal bills in 2018, Massoglia noted.

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