Quantcast
Connect with us

‘Couldn’t have picked a worse city’: Pittsburgh mayor blasts Trump use of city for Paris pullout justification

Published

on

Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto was furious at the line President Donald Trump said during his speech Thursday pulling out of the Paris Climate Agreement.

“Couldn’t have picked a worst city,” he said flatly. “I was in Paris with 500 mayors around the world. It wasn’t only heavy on fossil fuels but it went through a depression where our unemployment was greater than the Great Depression.’ It was only when we started to look to the future we started to have an economy going up. Today, we’re back on a global stage, not through our old economy, through robotics and artificial intelligence and if it weren’t for that position Pittsburgh would never have been able to get back up.”

ADVERTISEMENT

He went on to say that Trump saying he’s going to give coal miners jobs again are giving them “false hopes.”

“I know them personally. They live around my city. I have family that lives in West Virginia,” he continued. “What I say to them, look at the example what Pittsburgh was able to do. If there was ever a hope from the Paris Agreement in the example of a city, our air was so bad we had to have our street lights on 24 hours. We understood we would build out a new economy and it would take time. There’s nothing progressive about laying off a coal miner and a way to transition and understand as the world starts to finance new energy as the world finance banks understand that’s where it’s moving, the United States will either be part of that or we will be left behind and watch Germany and Southeast Asia lead the economic revolution.”

Listen to his full remarks below:


'Couldn't have picked a worse city': Pittsburgh… by sarahburris

ADVERTISEMENT

Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

WATCH: Saturday Night Live airs Christmas special — that’s just one giant dig at the Electoral College

Published

on

NBC's "Saturday Night Live" aired an opening skit that was just one giant attack on the electoral college.

A snowman introduced the segment, saying that we could look in on the holiday table conversation thanks to hacked Nest cams.

The skit featured a house in San Francisco, California, a second in Charleston, South Carolina and a third in Atlanta, Georgia.

Each dinner table debated impeachment, and the differences between President Donald Trump and his predecessor, President Barack Obama.

But then the snowman said that none of their votes matter.

"They'll debate the issues all year long, but then it all comes down to 1,000 people in Wisconsin who won't even think about the election until the morning of," the snowman said. "And that's the magic of the Electoral College."

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Georgia mayor being recalled for racism resigns from office: report

Published

on

Hoschton Mayor Theresa Kenerly resigned in a special city council meeting held on Saturday, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported Saturday.

"The resignation came just days after Councilman Jim Cleveland resigned saying he‘d rather leave office on his own terms than face voters in a recall election next month," the newspaper reported. "Both resignations follow an AJC investigation launched seven months ago into claims that an African American candidate for city administrator was sidetracked by Mayor Theresa Kenerly because of his race."

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Nine 2020 Democrats unite to demand DNC Chair Tom Perez scrap debate rules: report

Published

on

The Democratic National Committee is facing a revolt for the party's 2020 presidential candidates for its restrictive debate rules.

"Nine Democratic presidential candidates, including the party's front-runners, are urging the Democratic National Committee to toss out the current polling and fundraising rules used to determine who appears in televised debates and reopen the exchanges to better reflect the historic diversity of the current field. The candidates say the rules exclude diverse candidates in the field from participating," CBS News reported Saturday evening.

Continue Reading