Quantcast
Connect with us

Pence’s prayer breakfast appearance underscores the fractures in American Catholicism

Published

on

- Commentary

The annual National Catholic Prayer Breakfast is hardly a bipartisan or nonpolitical event. It was founded in 2004 as part of an effort to cement ties between conservative Catholics, the Catholic hierarchy, and the GOP. Among those associated with it are noted right-wing luminaries like Leonard Leo of the Federalist Society, Austin Ruse of C-FAM, former Senator Rick Santorum, and conservative organizations like the Knights of Columbus and Americans United for Life.

ADVERTISEMENT

This article is reprinted with permission from Religion Dispatches. Follow RD on Facebook or Twitter for daily updates.

In fact, President George W. Bush, along with various prominent Catholic prelates, headlined the event from 2005 until 2008, including an appearance with Denver Archbishop Charles Chaput in 2004. The first post-Bush breakfast in 2009 featured the conservative Catholic dream team of Justice Antonin Scalia and Cardinal Raymond Burke.

In 2012, when the Catholic bishops were enmeshed in a make-or-break effort to cripple the contraception mandate in the Affordable Care Act and link it to a larger “religious liberty” effort, Knights of Columbus President Carl Anderson used the breakfast to try and strike fear into the hearts of God-fearing Catholics over their scrambled eggs, telling them, “Never in the lifetime of anyone present here, has the religious liberty of the American people been as threatened as it is today.”

So it’s hardly surprising that at his address to the breakfast Tuesday, Vice President Mike Pence, who was introduced by Anderson, played to the crowd, touting the Trump administration’s executive order on “religious liberty” and plans to eviscerate the contraceptive mandate:

President Trump stands for the religious liberty of every American and the right of our people of faith to live out your convictions in the public square. … Just last month, the Little Sisters of the Poor were at the White House, and on that day, I had the high honor to stand as President Trump signed an executive order to restore religious liberty in the public square. I couldn’t have been more proud.

ADVERTISEMENT

And in case anyone needed reminding, he also vouched for Trump’s anti-abortion bona fides, including a dramatically expanded Mexico City policy and the measure that would allow states to withhold funding from Planned Parenthood:

I couldn’t be more proud to serve as Vice President to a President who stands without apology for the sanctity of human life. … Since day one of this administration, President Donald Trump has been keeping his promise to stand for life, and life is winning in America again.

But Pence’s overriding message was that “American Catholics have an ally in President Donald Trump.” And while he paid lip-service for the need for Catholics to pray, not so much “for a cause as for country,” it was clear that his job was to seek reciprocity for that support by rallying conservative Catholics to the rapidly eroding bastions of the besieged Fort Trump.

ADVERTISEMENT

Pence’s appearance was, in many ways, a coda to the effort that began in the run-up to the 2000 presidential election to fuse conservative Catholics and evangelicals into a reliable right-wing electoral bloc, delivered, appropriately, by a man who personifies the rise of evangelical Catholics or, in Pence’s case, catholic Evangelicals.

Pence’s appearance, coming after 60 percent of white Catholic cast their vote for Trump, signals the end of anything that could remotely be called a cohesive Catholic laity in America. There are now three distinct American Catholicisms. One is a shadow church of ex-Catholics that’s helped fuel the rise of the “nones.” Many of these former Catholics retain a cultural affinity for Catholicism and an attachment to the social justice values of the church, but no longer identify as Catholics and tend to be Democrats or Independents.

ADVERTISEMENT

The second is the besieged and shrinking progressive wing of the church—people who still identify as Catholics and attend Mass, at least sometimes, but are seeing their power in the church and the larger culture shrink as progressive Catholicism atrophies due to the aging of the Vatican II generation and the loss of Gen X and Millennial Catholics to “none-ism.” The only growing part of this wing is the Latino Catholic population, but that too is being eroded by disaffiliation and defections to evangelical churches.

Finally, there is the evangelical Catholic wing of the church which the Republican Party has so assiduously cultivated for the past twenty years and dominates the public life of the church, despite the efforts of Pope Francis to push back with the appointment of more moderate and less political prelates like Chicago’s Cardinal Blase Cupich.

This wing of the church is now wholly fused with the political and policy priorities of the Republican Party, ignoring Pope Francis’ entreatments regarding climate change and its effects on the environment, global income disparities, and compassion for immigrants. And, as Michael O’Loughlin noted in America, “The founder of the National Catholic Prayer Breakfast, Joseph Cella, was an early supporter of Mr. Trump and helped organize Catholic support for the G.O.P. nominee.”

ADVERTISEMENT

These “Cathangelicals” are, for all intents and purposes, today’s Catholic Church—at least in the public square—and Pence is their preacher.


Report typos and corrections to: [email protected].
READ COMMENTS - JOIN THE DISCUSSION
Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

Donald Trump sounds like a complete lunatic because he’s isolated himself in a far-right media bubble

Published

on

Welcome to another edition of What Fresh Hell?, Raw Story’s roundup of news items that might have become controversies under another regime, but got buried – or were at least under-appreciated – due to the daily firehose of political pratfalls, unhinged tweet storms and other sundry embarrassments coming out of the current White House.

If you have an older relative who spends way too much time stewing in the conservative media, you may have experienced a moment when you not only disagreed with him, but you realized that you had no earthly clue what he was going on about. Perhaps it was when he started talking about the UN plot to eliminate golf courses and replace paved roads with bicycle paths. Maybe he stopped you in your tracks with a discourse on why flies were attracted to Barack Obama, or complained about the government insisting on referring to Christians as "Easter-worshippers" or expressed outrage over 9/11 hijackers being given leniency by Muslim jurists.

Continue Reading

Breaking Banner

American exceptionalism is killing the planet

Published

on

Ever since 2007, when I first started writing for TomDispatch, I’ve been arguing against America’s forever wars, whether in Afghanistan, Iraq, or elsewhere. Unfortunately, it’s no surprise that, despite my more than 60 articles, American blood is still being spilled in war after war across the Greater Middle East and Africa, even as foreign peoples pay a far higher price in lives lost and cities ruined. And I keep asking myself: Why, in this century, is the distinctive feature of America's wars that they never end? Why do our leaders persist in such repetitive folly and the seemingly eternal disasters that go with it?

Continue Reading
 

Breaking Banner

Team Trump wants to steal another election — and there’s only one way to beat them back

Published

on

When I was growing up at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, back in the early 1960s, my mother drove down to Kansas City one morning to go shopping and have lunch with an old friend of her mother’s. Ladies going out shopping and having lunch in the upscale Country Club Plaza in Kansas City was almost a formal occasion. I remember she put on a summery suit and heels and stockings, and I’m pretty sure she wore a pair of white cotton gloves.

When she returned a few hours later, she wasn’t carrying any bags from the shops, and she was seething. The woman she’d eaten lunch with was married to a man who owned a chain of downtown hotels in major cities around the country. They lived in a big Tudor house in Mission Hills, the Beverly Hills of the Midwest. She drove a Cadillac. She was rich.

Continue Reading