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‘Republican suicide’: GOP Rep sounds the horn on what ending DACA really means

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While most of the world reacted with horror at the news that President Donald Trump plans to announce a repeal of the Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals Act (DACA) because it means 800,000 Americans could be forced out of the only homeland they’ve ever known, one person was sick with disappointment that the roundups won’t start for six months.

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That person is Rep. Steve King (R-IA), according to The Hill, which said King took to Twitter to vent his spleen and proclaim that the six-month delay will be the death of not just the deportation effort, but of the entire Republican Party.

“Ending DACA now gives chance 2 restore Rule of Law. Delaying so R Leadership can push Amnesty is Republican suicide,” King fumed on Twitter.

Given the significant outcry among even Republicans regarding the DACA repeal, there is a chance that Congress could act within the next six months to stop the expulsion of this group of non-native-born Americans.

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King — a member of the House of Representatives’ far-right Freedom Caucus — is one of the most viciously nativist Republicans in Congress. In the past he has accused Dreamers of being drug smugglers “with calves the size of cantaloupes” who hike across the U.S.-Mexico border and into the country with giant loads of drugs on their backs.

In one CNN interview, he grudgingly admitted that his worldview and policies demonstrate a “thinly-veiled anti-Latino bias,” but he then said it’s liberals’ fault for interpreting his “demographic facts” — they are not facts — as racist.

So while there may be precious little to celebrate, let’s at least take a moment to enjoy Steve King’s pain.

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Have a pleasant tomorrow.


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Bill Barr denies giving the order to gas protesters for Trump photo-op

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America's top law enforcement office on Friday denied giving the highly-controversial order to gas protesters prior to a photo-op with President Donald Trump holding a Bible.

"Attorney General William Barr says law enforcement officers were already moving to push back protesters from a park in front of the White House when he arrived there Monday evening, and he says he did not give a command to disperse the crowd, though he supported the decision," The Associated Press reports.

"Barr’s comments in an interview with The Associated Press on Friday were his most detailed explanation yet of what unfolded outside the White House earlier this week. They come after the White House and others said repeatedly that the attorney general ordered officers to clear the park," the AP reported. "Shortly after officers aggressively pushed back demonstrators, President Donald Trump — accompanied by Barr, Pentagon leaders and other top advisers — walked through Lafayette Park to pose for a photo at a nearby church that had been damaged during the protests."

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Jeb Bush wonders why Republicans are not ‘stepping up’ to condemn racism

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Former Gov. Jeb Bush (R-FL) wondered on Friday why more Republicans were not standing publicly against racism.

"I have said it before and I will say it again now: the GOP must not tolerate racism. Of any kind. At any time," his son, George P. Bush, the Texas Land Commissioner posted on Twitter.

He urged local GOP officials in Texas to resign for sharing racist posts on Facebook.

Jeb Bush praised the post.

"Proud of my son," he posted on Twitter.

"Are other Republican elected officials stepping up?" he wondered.

https://twitter.com/JebBush/status/1269057568015605761

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‘Not appropriate at all’: GOP senator admits it was wrong to gas protesters for Trump’s photo-op

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The decision to gas protesters so President Donald Trump could hold a photo-op holding a Bible were criticized by a Republican senator on Friday as cracks start to emerge in Republicans' support for the president.

"As you know, outside the White House when protesters were peacefully exercising their rights, there were rubber bullets and tear gas, they were disbursed so he could go for the pictures, the photo-op at the church," CNN's Erin Burnett reported.

She noted criticism by former General Mattis and asked Sen. Tim Scott (R-SC) if he agreed.

"I would say no question the scene that I understand occurred there with the tear gas and rubber bullets was unnecessary, not appropriate at all," he replied.

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